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CATHOLIC 

THEOLOGICAL UNION 




AT CHICAGO 



1996-98 Catalog 



This catalog is a publication of Catholic Theological Union, 
5401 S. Cornell Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60615-5698. 

For admissions information 

Call (312) 324-8000 or FAX (312) 324-8490. 

Note: Beginning with October, 1996, the area code will be 773. 



Catholic Theological Union 



-'^,„ .^. M'^^rr- 



A Word From The President 




Dear Friend, 

[ The Holy Spirit is perhaps at work within you, leading you to 

consider ministry within the Church or calling you to take some time for 
personal and theological renewal. I sincerely believe 
that Catholic Theological Union at Chicago can help 
you answer the call of the Spirit. 

Catholic Theological Union has an excellent 
faculty. They are ready to offer you the very best in 
scholarship and teaching. Our graduates comment 
repeatedly that this faculty has a genuine interest in 
each student. 

The spirit of CTU is that of a community living the dream of the 
post-Vatican II Church. It is a community enriched by the cultures of 
students who come here from 40 countries. The heritage of CTU comes 
from the charisms of 36 religious communities that have joined the Union. 
The presence of both religious men preparing for the priesthood and the 
lay and religious women and men preparing for other ministries in the 
Church enriches all. The ecumenical collaboration of CTU with the 10 
other members of the Association of Chicago Theological Schools, its 
urban setting and its relationship with the University of Chicago are other 
reasons why CTU is a great place to study. 

Know that the entire CTU community-faculty, staff, students and 
administration-will welcome you warmly. Your gifts and talents will 
enrich us and we will treasure you because you will bring a unique 
contribution to the spirit of Catholic Theological Union. 



Sincerely yours, 
Norman E. Bevan, C.S.Sp. 



President 



Table Of Contents 



GENERAL INFORMATION 5 

Identity 6 

Mission 7 

Setting 7 

Campus 8 

Library 8 

Special Programs and Resources 9 

THE FACULTY 11 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 25 

Degree Programs 26 

Master of Divinity (M.Div.) 26 

Master of Arts (M.A.) 29 

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies (M.A.P.S.) 31 

Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) 32 

Certificate Programs 34 

Biblical Spirituality 34 

Liturgical Studies 34 

Pastoral Studies 34 

Spiritual Formation 34 

Cross-Cultural Mission 35 

Continuing Education 35 

Sabbatical Program... 35 

Summer Institute 35 

Ministers in the Vicinity 35 

Study in Special Areas of Ministry 36 

World Mission Program 36 

Spirituality Studies 36 

Hispanic Ministry 37 

Oscar Romero Scholars Program 37 

Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry Program 37 

Joint African-American Ministries Program 38 

Native American Ministries 38 

Institute for Liturgical Consultants 38 

Off-Campus Study 38 

Israel Study Programs 38 

Overseas Training Program 39 

Louvain Study 39 

Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies 40 

Claret Center 40 

National Capital Semester 40 

United Nations and World Faiths 40 

Sheptytsky Institute in Eastern Christian Studies 40 

The Institute for Black Catholic Studies 41 



ABLE Of Contents 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION... 43 

Admissions Policies 44 

Academic Policies 46 

COURSE OFFERINGS... 51 

Biblical Literature and Languages Department 53 

Cross-Cultural Ministries Department 58 

Historical and Doctrinal Studies Department 63 

Historical Studies 63 

Doctrinal Studies 64 

Ethical Studies 68 

Spirituality and Pastoral Care Department 70 

Spirituality Studies 70 

Pastoral Care Studies 73 

Word and Worship Department 74 

Interdisciplinary and Integrative Studies 78 

Field Education 79 

STUDENT LIFE 81 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 85 

APPENDIX 89 

The Administration 90 

Communities Participating in the Union 91 

Board of Trustees 93 

Accreditation 95 

The Association of Chicago Theological Schools 96 

Mailing Address 97 

Telephone and FAX Directory 98 

Directions to CTU 99 

Academic Calendar 100 



Note of special importance about this catalog: 

The catalog does not constitute a contract with students and/or applicants. Catholic 

Theological Union reserves the right to revise it and the policies derived from it as 

appropriate. 



General Information 



li 



General Information 



About Catholic Theological Union 

Catholic Theological Union at Chicago [CTU] is a Roman Catholic school of theology 
and ministry that prepares people to serve the Church in the United States and 
throughout the world. To this end students, faculty, administration and staff unite 
in the pursuit of academic excellence, ministerial leadership and commitment to 
service. The setting for this collaborative effort is an urban, ecumenical, multicultural 

and university environment. 

Catholic Theological Union began as an effort to 
provide seminarians from several religious 
communities with a priestly formation that responded 
to the spirit and vision of the Second Vatican Council. 
Today, a total of 36 religious communities form the 
Union, making CTU the largest Roman Catholic 
graduate school of theology and ministry in the 
United States. 

The original focus of CTU was the academic and 
ministerial formation of candidates for the priesthood. 
While this continues to be a central part of the school's 
mission, CTU has expanded its programs to meet the 
needs of the Church and society today. This 
development reflects a deep commitment to 
professional education for the wide variety of 
ministries serving the Church and for the continuing 
education of ministers. More than half of CTU's 
current students are women and men preparing for 
effective pastoral leadership as lay ministers through 
degree programs or contmuing their professional education for current ministries. 




The Columbian Exposition of 1893 was 
held in Chicago's lakefront Hyde Park 
community. The fair left Hyde Park the 
Museum of Science and Industry, a 
legacy of spacious parks and a vital 
interest in the arts. 



In 1991 Catholic Theological Union reviewed its goals and revised its Identity and 
Mission Statements: 

Identity 

Catholic Theological Union is a graduate school of 
theology and mmistry sponsored by Roman Catholic 
religious institutes and societies of apostolic life. In 
response to the Second Vatican Council, the school's 
founders chose to unite their seminaries to educate 
more creatively for the religious priesthood and to 
locate the school near other graduate schools of 
theology and the University of Chicago so students 
and faculty may benefit from and contribute to 
theological scholarship and ministerial formation in 
an urban, ecumenical and university setting. 




international Women's Scholars Bona 
Maandera of Uganda, left, and Patricia 
Aguirre of Peru, right, are among the 120 
international students from 38 countries 
enriching the mix of cultural and ethnic 
diversity. 



General Information 



Reflecting the diverse cultures, nationalities and races of women and men who make up 
the CTU community, the school sees the pursuit of justice, inclusivity and collaboration 
as integral to its ethos. 

Mission 

The primary mission of Catholic Theological Union is the academic and pastoral 
formation of students preparing for priesthood and for a variety of other ministries in the 
United States and around the world. The school also provides continuing theological 
education for clergy, religious and lay persons. CTU is committed to theological 
education and scholarship within a community of faith in interaction with a living 
Catholic tradition and ecumenical, interfaith and cross-cultural perspectives and 
resources. Through its degree programs and other educational and formational 
opportunities, CTU strives to educate effective leaders for the Church whose mission is 
to witness Christ's good news of justice, love and peace to people of all nations. 

Setting 

Chicago, a city with exceptional educational, ministerial, cultural, entertainment and 

recreational resources, is home to the Catholic 
Theological Union. The metropolitan area has the 
second largest concentration of Roman Catholics in the 
United States and so offers many opportunities to serve 
in local parishes, hospitals and other human service 
institutions. Chicago's many fine universities, colleges, 
libraries, museums, galleries and cultural centers can 
broaden every student's horizons. The area offers 
events ranging from concerts and theater to professional 
sports. Chicagoland's many parks and forest preserves 
are crowned by more than 29 miles of parks and 
beaches along Lake Michigan. CTU's campus is just a 
short walk from the lake. 




The 29-mile long Chicago lakefront 
provides bikepaths and parklands for 
recreation and enjoyment. 



Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, and CTU is part of 
the south side neighborhood of Hyde Park. It is a 
cosmopolitan, stable and integrated neighborhood with a strong sense of community. 
The neighborhood is anchored by the University of Chicago, one of the world's premier 
research universities. Hyde Park is also among the most religiously diverse areas of the 
city. There are churches of most major Christian ecclesial communities, several 
synagogues, a mosque and Hindu and Buddhist places of worship. 



Besides CTU and the Divinity School of the University, there are four other theological 
schools in Hyde Park: Chicago Theological Seminary, the Lutheran School of Theology 
at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary and Meadville/Lombard Theological 
School. Together they form the Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools. CTU also 



General Information 



belongs to the Association of Chicago Theological Schools [ACTS]. The 1 1 Chicagoland 
schools that make up ACTS cooperate through student cross-registration, library access 
and faculty interchange. Each year the ACTS schools combined offer over 1,000 
courses taught by 350 faculty. The collective library resources of the ACTS schools 
number 1.5 million books with over 5,000 periodicals. In addition, ACTS enables 
students and faculty to pursue their work with people of many different cultural and 
theological traditions. 

The Campus 

Three buildings on South Cornell Avenue are occupied by Catholic Theological Union. 
Seven floors of the 10-story building at 5401 South Cornell Avenue provide space for 

classrooms, administrative and faculty offices, 
.«A n'"''^^^S * * " ^^^^^^^6 chapel, library, art gallery, dining and lounge 
^^^ ^^^BHJ"^-^ ^ j^jK^^ M facilities, meeting rooms and audiovisual 

laboratory. Additional office and classroom 

facilities are located in the building at 5326 South 

Cornell Avenue. 

Living quarters for some of the religious 
communities of men occupy three floors of the 
5401 buildmg. The 5326 and 5420 buildings 
Constructed originally as a hotel. CTU's main serve as living quarters for other students. Both 
building houses the libraiy classrooms, offices, efficiency and one-bedroom apartments are 

dining room and some residences. ■' ^ 

available. 




The Library 

The Catholic Theological Union Library contains 

100,000 volumes, providing resources for study 

and research by students and faculty members. It 

currently receives over 580 periodicals. Beyond 

the general theological holdings, the library has 

special collections m mission studies, history of 

religions and homiletics. A recent addition to the 

library is the Weber-Killgallon collection in religious education. CTU's membership in 

the Association of Chicago Theological Schools, the Chicago Library System, the Illinois 

Library Computer System Organization and the On-line Catalog Library Cooperative 

allows library patrons access to other library resources in the city of Chicago, the state of 

Illinois and the rest of the nation. 




General Information 



Special Programs and Resources 
The Chicago Center for Global Ministries 

Stephen Bevans, S.V.D., Director, Richard Bliese, Associate Director 

To meet the growing challenges to preparation for ministry posed by trends in 
globalization today, Catholic Theological Union, the Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago and McCormick Theological Seminary established the Chicago Center for 
Global Ministries (CCGM). The Center coordinates the considerable resources available 
among the three schools and builds upon those resources to meet the challenge for global 
ministries. World mission, cross-cultural studies, the study of and dialogue with the 
world's religions, urban ministry and studies concerned with peace, justice and ecology 
receive special attention from the CCGM. 

The Center focuses on these areas of mmistry by coordinating courses, offering a 
forum for faculty, providing a locus for new research efforts and giving students 
opportunities to learn from local and international cross-cultural experiences. In 
addition, it sponsors lectures, coordinates the annual Chicago World Mission Institute 
and helps with the annual Mission Orientation sponsored by several church bodies. The 
Center also sponsors a scholar-in-residence program that brings non- Western scholars to 
teach and do research at the three schools. 

Jewish Studies 

Continuing grants from the Jewish Chautauqua Society support a lectureship in Jewish 
Studies. Subsequent grants from the Charles and M.R. Shapiro Foundation, the Annie 
Gamble Foundation and the Hans and Annaliese Elias Trust helped this lectureship grow 
into a vital program of Jewish studies in the spirit of the Jewish-Christian dialogue 
inspired by Vatican II. 

Hayim Goren Perehnuter, the Chautauqua Professor of Jewish Studies, offers a variety of 
courses in rabbinic Judaism. The Shapiro Lectures bring outstanding scholars to CTU. 
The Jewish Studies Program makes possible significant dialogue and exciting 
interchange at both the faculty and student level and supports library acquisitions and 
special conferences. 

Visiting Scholars 

The Chicago Provmce of the Society of the Divine Word established the Divine Word 
Scholar- in-Residence m 1976 to bring scholars from other countries to teach at CTU. 
These visiting scholars offer courses for one or more quarters. Other participating 
communities have also sponsored various visiting scholars to enrich the curriculum. 



General Information 



New Theology Review 

The Ne\i' Theology Review, published by the Liturgical Press, is a joint project of 
Catholic Theological Union and Washington Theological Union. This journal applies 
recent research in biblical studies, systematic theology, ethics, liturgy and spirituality to 
the problems and issues facing pastoral ministers in today's Church. Primarily focused 
on the American scene, NTR also extends its attention to questions before the Church in 
other parts of the world. While faculty from the two sponsoring schools contribute 
substantially to the journal, NTR also draws from among the leading authors on the 

religious scene today. 

> 

Stauros 

Stauros, U.S.A., sponsored by the Passionist Congregation, is an ecumenical organization 
that promotes studies and programs on specific areas of human suffering. Located at 
CTU since 1981, Stauros engages in dialogue with the suffering, with the helping 
professions and with religious traditions. 








Monsignor John Egan once described CTU as Bold and Faithful to reflect CTU's adaptive genius and faithfulness to 
its Roman Catholic heritage. 



10 



The Faculty 



11 



&®*rt*s^sw^f^^^^8A«^-< 



The Faculty 




\ 



wiki^ m 







Herbert Anderson 
Professor of Pastoral Theology 

B.D., Augustana Seminary; 
Ph.D., Drew University 

Learning the art of empathy is at the heart of Herbert 
Anderson's approach to pastoral care. He sees this art as 
essential in a multicultural context like CTU. Besides his 
focus on ministry with families and people in grief, he 
explores pastoral theology as a unifying perspective on parish 
ministry. > 



Claude Marie Barbour 
Professor of World Mission 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; 

S.T.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

Claude Marie Barbour teaches in the area of Native American 

Ministries. Her theological and missionary interests focus on 

the intersection of gospel and culture. She is also engaged in 

missionary research related to reconciliation and healing 

among refugees and survivors of human rights abuses. 





< Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. 

Professor of Old Testament Studies 
Director of the D.Min. Program 

M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis University 

Dianne Bergant examines how ancient Israel functioned in 
the past and how it can be meaningful in the present. She is 
also concerned about how critical tools of modem scholarship 
can serve a theological goal. Her research interests include 
biblical theology and interpretation, the integrity of creation, 
feminism and liberation perspectives and world mission. 



12 



The Faculty 



Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. 

Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.B., S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame; Study: University of Cambridge 
Besides his service as a faculty member, Stephen Bevans has 
served as the first director of the Chicago Center for Global 
Ministries. His teaching and research probe the ways that the 
gospel can fmd expression in different cultural settings. He is 
also careful to present theology as a practical discipline that 
emerges from the community of faith. 





Barbara E. Bowe, R.S.C.J. 
Associate Professor of Biblical Studies 
Director of the Biblical Spirituality Program 

M.Ed., Boston College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; Th.D., 
Harvard University 

Several years of teaching experience in a Philippine graduate 
school of theology has instilled in Barbara Bowe an interest 
in the interpretation of the biblical tradition in cross-cultural 
contexts. Also, biblical spirituality is an underlying emphasis 
in much of her teaching. Special research interests include 
Johannine and Pauline studies plus issues of early Christian 
ecclesiology. 



Edward Foley, Capuchin 
Professor of Liturgy and Music 

M.Div., St. Francis Seminary; M. Mus., University of Wisconsin; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 
A member of the faculty since 1985, Edward Foley's 
interests include practical theology, the interplay of worship 
and the arts, especially music, ritual performance and 
medieval Christianity. He studies the history of worship 
especially from the viewpoint of the assembly. 




13 



The Faculty 




Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. 
Associate Professor of Ethics 

M.A., Xavier University, Cincinnati; Ph.D., Catholic University 
of America 

Archimedes Fornasari spends part of every academic year 
teaching at the Catholic University of East Africa in Nairobi, 
Kenya. His particular interest lies in the acculturation of 
Christianity in Marxist thought and society. The goal of his 
study and teaching is to discover patterns of discourse and 
praxis that provide an understandable theology, a credible 
proclamation of the Gospel and effective pastoral activity. 



Richard N. Fragomeni 

Associate Professor of Liturgy and Preaching 

S.T.B., M.A., University of Louvain; M.A., Ph.D., M. Music, Catholic 
University of America 

Richard Fragomeni is a presbyter of the Diocese of Albany, 
New York. His work involves him in conversation with 
theology, interpretation theory and poetry. His current work is 
in the field of word and sacrament: the intersection of symbolic 
activity and language as it creates insights into the Christian 
proclamation of grace. Central to his work is a fascination with 
the power of liturgy and preaching in the transformation of 
consciousness. 





Mark Francis, C.S.V. 
Associate Professor of Liturgy 

M.A., M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; S.L.L., S.L.D., Pontifical 
Liturgical Institute of St. Anselm 

Mark Francis is particularly interested in the relationship 
between liturgy and culture. He regularly offers seminars in 
the area of liturgical inculturation, popular religion and 
worship and in the history of the liturgy. 



14 



The Faculty 



Mary Frohlich 

Assistant Professor of Spirituality 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of America 
A fascination with liow the contemplative or "mystical" 
dimension plays itself out in human life has focused Mary 
Frohlich's teaching and research. Her specific interests 
include the interpretation of spiritual classics, the role of 
psychological factors in spiritual development and 
philosophical perspectives on contemporary spirituality. 





Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. 

Professor of Theological Anthropology 

M.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; Study: University of 
Cambridge 

A personal priority of Anthony Gittins is to combine teaching 
and speaking with learning and listening. His research 
focuses on the dynamics of inculturation by using 
anthropological and theological lenses and his pastoral 
outreach includes Chicago's disenfranchised and cultures 
from Africa to the Pacific. 



Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
Director of the M.A. Program 

Dr. Theol., Friedrich-Wilhelm University, Bonn; Litt. D., St. 
Bonaventure University; Litt. D., Quincy College 
Zachary Hayes is trained in medieval philosophy and 
theology, with a specialization in the work of St. 
Bonaventure. He has also done extensive study of modem 
Christian thought and is currently working on problems of 
contemporary theological cosmology and its relation to the 
positive sciences. 




15 



The Faculty 




Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M. 
Professor of Old Testament Studies 

M.A., Aquinas Institute of Theology; Ph.D., Northwestern University 
and Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
Beside his teaching and research in Old Testament 
interpretation, an abiding interest of LesHe Hoppe is biblical 
archaeology. He has served on the staff of several excavation 
projects in Galilee and has written general interest articles and 
books on archaeological topics. His teaching focuses on the 
prophetic, Deuteronomic and intertestamental literature. He 
also enthusiastically promotes the study of Biblical Hebrew. 



John Huels, O.S.M. 

Associate Professor of Church Law 

M.A., M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; J.C.B., J.C.L., J. CD., 
Catholic University of America 

Within the broad range of canonical concerns, John Huels' 
primary interest, research and writing have dealt with 
sacramental law. 





Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. 
Professor of Liturgy 

M.A., Catholic University of America; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame 

Kathleen Hughes' interests include sacraments, language, 
women and worship, presiding, the liturgical movement, the 
RCIA, patterns of prayers, liturgy and justice, active 
participation and Sunday worship in the absence of a priest. 
She serves on the Advisory Committee of the U.S. Bishops' 
Committee on the Liturgy and the International Commission 
on English in the Liturgy. 



The Faculty 



John Kaserow, M.M., ^ 

Professor of Mission Studies 
Coordinator for World Mission 

M.Th., M.Div., Maryknoll School of Theology; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; Ph.D., University of St. Michael's College, Toronto. 
John Kaserow brings to his teaching an excellent 
interdisciplinary background and rich practical experience in 
Asian studies. His deep commitment to mission is well 
integrated with a strong academic perspective. 





Bruce H. Lescher 

Associate Professor of Spirituality 

M.A., University of Michigan; M.A.S., University of San Francisco; 
Ph.D., Graduate Theological Union 

Bruce Lescher's teaching and research interests include the 
history of Christian spirituality, particularly American 
Catholic spirituality. In addition to his focus on the "how to" 
dimensions of living a spiritual life such as prayer, 
discernment and spiritual direction, he is examining the social 
implications of spiritual commitment. 



Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. 
Associate Professor of Religious Education 
Director of the M.A.P.S. Program 
Director of Field Education 

M.A., Mundelein College; M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; 
D. Min., Chicago Theological Seminary 
Jeanette Lucinio teaches in the area of religious education 
and her special interests include sacramental catechesis, 
adult faith formation and the Rite of Christian Initiation as 
it relates to children of catechetical age and their families. 
She has traveled to Lithuania and Russia to help Catholic 
communities reestablish their catechetical programs. 




17 



The Faculty 




Kevin Madigan 

Assistant Professor of Church History 

M.A., University of Virginia; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

Kevin Madigan joined the faculty in 1994. His interests 
include the history of monasticism and religious orders, 
the history of lay piety and premodem christology. The 
premodem exegetical history of the Bible, particularly the 
gospels has been the object of his research. 



Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. 
Associate Professor of Ethics 

M.A., M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago; Study: University of Cambridge 

Although interested in a wide range of ethical issues, much of 
Thomas Nairn's research has been in the area of health care 
ethics. As a theological consultant to the health care task 
force of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious and 
the Conference of Major Superiors of Men, he recently 
developed a reflection instrument for end-of-life decision- 
making for religious. His current work is taking him further 
into the question of how religious and cultural values 
interplay in these decisions as well as the question of corporate ethics in health care. 





Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. 
Director of the Library 

A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Kenneth O'Malley is a respected expert in acquisitions and 
collection development. Besides his service on accrediting 
teams of the American Theological Library Association in the 
United States, he has been a consultant to libraries in 
Australia, New Zealand, India and Rome. 



18 



The Faculty 



Carolyn Osiek, R.S.C.J. 

Professor of New Testament Studies 

MAT., Manhattanville College; Th.D., Harvard University 
A frequent director of CTU's travel study programs, Carolyn 
Osiek has a special interest in early Christian art and 
archaeology and the social-science interpretation of early 
Christianity. Other interests include feminist hermeneutics 
and Pauline literaUire. She is a New Testament scholar well 
respected in her field and has served as the president of the 
Catholic Biblical Association of America. 




Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 
Professor of Liturgy 
Director of tfie M.Div. Program 

S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; Study: 
Harvard University, University of California 
Gilbert Ostdiek teaches in the area of the theology and 
celebration of the sacraments, Eucharist, Reconciliation, 
ritual studies, liturgical catechesis, the shaping of places for 
worship and liturgical spirituality. His research interests 
include the anthropological study of ritual and the 
connections between worship and pastoral care. He directs a 
program that certifies liturgical consultants for the building 

and renovation of churches, and he works on the translation and revision of liturgical 

texts for the International Commission on English in the Liturgy. 




John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 
Professor of Ethics 

Ph.D., University of Chicago 

John Pawlikowski's extensive study of the Nazi Holocaust 
has enabled hun to appreciate the ethical challenges facing 
the human community as it struggles with greatly enhanced 
power and extended responsibility for the future of all 
creation. His scholarly interests cover the range of 
theological and ethical aspects of the Christian- Jewish 
relationship and public ethics. He is a leading figure in the 
Christian- Jewish dialogue. 




19 



The Faculty 




Hayim Goren Perelmuter 
Chautauqua Professor of Jewish Studies 

M.H.L., Jewish Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L. and D.D., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion 
After a career in the rabbinate, Hayim Perelmuter brings a 
special perspective to his teaching. As an academic, he has 
played a significant role in Jewish-Christian dialogue both 
here and internationally. Both his teaching and writing are an 
expression of his commitment to help J^s and Christians 
understand their common roots and distinctive histories in a 
way that brings peace and mending/to the world. 



Jamie T. Phelps, O.P. 

Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

Director of the Augustus Tolton Program 

M.S.W., University of Illinois; M.A., St. John's University; Ph.D., 
Catholic University of America 

Jamie Phelps has been an educator for more than 30 years. 
She also brings her experience as a pastoral minister and as 
a psychiatric social worker to her teaching. Her service as 
the Director of the Augustus Tolton Pastoral Training 
Program shows her commitment to the preparation of 
African- American lay people for service to the People of 
God. 





Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology 

Director of the Oscar Romero Program 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; S.T.D., Universidad Pontificia de 
Salamanca 

El Salvador-born, Ana Maria Pineda has been a voice and 
presence for U.S. Hispanic communities through her 
teaching, writing and lecturing. Two particular concerns 
have been especially important to her; theological education 
for Hispanic ministry and pastoral ministry in Hispanic 
communities. In her teaching, she examines questions of 
faith and culture, popular religion and the importance of oral 
tradition. 



20 



The Faculty 



Barbara Reid, O.P. ^ 

Associate Professor of New Testament Studies 

M.A., Aquinas College; Ph.D., Catholic University of America 
Barbara Reid has served on the faculty for eight years and has 
proven to be a popular teacher. Her dissertation on the 
Transfiguration has been well received in scholarly circles 
and her work on women in the Gospel of Luke makes current 
feminist biblical scholarship available to preachers, teachers 
and pastoral ministers. 





Gary Riebe-Estrelia, S.V.D. 

Assistant Professor of Hispanic Ministry and 

Doctrinal Theology 

M.A., DePaul University; S.T.D., Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca 
In his teaching, Gary Riebe-Estrella treats traditional 
theological themes and questions of theological method from 
within the experience of the U.S. Hispanic community. His 
research includes the role of Hispanic Catholics as church in 
the U.S., the world of religious imagination in Mexican 
popular religion, issues in multiculturalism, culturally 
responsible theological formation for Hispanic pastoral agents 
and the formation of Hispanic candidates for religious life 
and priesthood. 



Robert Schreiter, C.Pp.S. 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

Theol. Dr., University of Nijmegen; Study: Oxford University 
Robert Schreiter is an internationally-recognized expert in 
the areas of inculturation and the world mission of the 
Church. He is interested in how the gospel is 
communicated in different cultures and in how a theology 
of reconciliation might shape missionary activity today. 




21 



The Faculty 



'W$^' Donald Senior, C.P. 

Professor of New Testament Studies 

S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain 
Throughout his years of studying and teaching the New 
Testament, Donald Senior has been absorbed by the Gospels, 
both the Synoptics and John. A particular interest has been 
the connection between the theological and literary 
characteristics of each Gospel and the pastoral and missionary 
contexts of the early Church. Familiarity with the history and 
landscape of the Middle East has also prompted a strong 
interest in the historical Jesus and the social and historical 
context of the New Testament. All of these issues, he 
believes, help make the biblical text come alive for the Church today. 




Paul Wadell, C.P. 
Professor of Ethics 

M.Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame 

The role of the virtues in the moral life and the development 
of character are two of Paul Wadell's research interests. His 
course offerings also show his concern for the place of 
friendship in the moral life, marriage and family life and 
issues of ecology. . 




22 



The Faculty 



ADJUNCT FACULTY 

Walter Brennan, O.S.M. 

Lecturer in Theology 

M.A., Stonebridge Priory; M.A., Ph.D., DePaul University 

Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky 

Assistant Professor of Eastern Christian Theology 

iVl.A., University of St. Michael's College, Toronto; 

S.T.D., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; Study: University of Notre Dame 

Eleanor Doidge, L.o.B. 

Associate Professor in Cross-Cultural Ministry 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary 

Juan Huitrado 

Lecturer in Cross-Cultural Ministry 

M.Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union 

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. 

Professor of New Testament 

M.A., John Carroll University; S.T.L., University of Fribourg; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; 

Eleve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

John Linnan, C.S.V. 

Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

M.A., S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain 

Jane Marie Osterholt, S.P. 

Lecturer in Religious Education 

M.E.D., Marygrove College; D.Min., University of St. Mary of the Lake 

Theodore Ross, S.J. 

Lecturer in Church History 

Ph.L., West Baden College; M.A. (History), M.A. (Theology), Loyola University; 

S.T.L., Bellarmine School of Theology 

Stephanie Paulsell 

Assistant Professor of Spirituality 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Joan Scanlon, O.P. 

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology 

Ph.D., Northwestern University and Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 



21 



The Faculty 



Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. 

Assistant Professor In Cross-Cultural Ministry , 

L. Miss., D.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian University 

Richard Walsh 

Lecturer in Religious Education 

M.R.Ed., M.A., Loyola University; M.Div., DeAndreis Institute of Theology 




Ana Maria Pineda, right, heads the Oscar Romero Scholars Program 
which prepares lay Hispanics for ministry. 



24 



Academic Programs 



i: 



^■ 




25 



Academic Programs 



Degree Programs 

In 1967 the Illinois Department of Higher 
Education approved Catholic Theological 
Union as a degree-granting institution. 
CTU offers four degrees: the Master of 
Divinity (M.Div.), the Master of Arts in 
theology (M.A.), the Master of Arts in 
Pastoral Studies, (M.A.P.S.), and the 
Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.). These 
degrees are fully accredited by both the 
Association of Theological Schools and 
the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 




The nearly 2,000 men and women who have graduated 
from CTU serve in 60 Chicago parishes, across the 
continent and in 65 countries. 



In addition to these degree programs, CTU and the University of Chicago School of 
Social Service Administration offer a dual A.M./M.Div. degree program. By a special 
arrangement with the University of Chicago, CTU students may also pursue a 
coordinated sequence of programs leading to the M.Div. degree from CTU and the Ph.D. 
from the University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Catholic Theological Union participates in a cooperative M.Div. program with the 
Ecumenical Theological Seminary of Detroit. Under this arrangement, ETS students can 
do one-third of their work at CTU and receive the M.Div. degree from CTU. 

A general description of each CTU degree program follows. A complete description of 
the regulations and requirements for these programs appears in the appropriate degree 
manual available from the program director. 

The Master of Divinity Program (M.Div.) 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. Director 

The Master of Divinity (M.Div.) is a first professional degree in ministry. CTU offers 
two tracks in the M.Div. Program. Both prepare students for full-time professional 
ministry in the Roman Catholic Church. Track I is particularly suited to the needs of lay 
and religious women and men who will not be ordained. Track II follows the 
specifications for the academic and ministerial formation of candidates for ordination as 
required by The Program of Priestly Formation (Washington: USCC, 1992), a 
publication of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops. 

Advising ~ 

A faculty advisor assists each M.Div. student in selecting courses that will meet his or her 
educational and vocational goals. The Field Education Director guides the student's 
engagement in supervised ministry experiences. 



26 



Academic Programs 



Courses 

There are foundational and advanced courses in the Master of Divinity Program. 

Foundational Courses (300 level) 

These mtroduce particular fields of study and are designed to provide 

knowledge and skills for advanced work. Foundational courses are required in Old 

Testament, New Testament, church history (2 courses). Christian ethics, social ethics, 

theology, pastoral care and liturgy. The foundational courses are the same for Track I 

and Track II students. They total 30 quarter hours of work. 

Besides these foundational courses, beginning M.Div. students normally participate 
in Ministry Practicum I (nine credit hours), a supervised ministry experience with 
theological reflection supplemented by a colloquium. All beginning students in ministry 
programs are also required to take three non-credit workshops on issues that CTU 
considers important to ministry, such as professional standards of conduct. 

Advanced Courses (400 and 500 level) 

These courses are designed to enhance knowledge and skills in various disciplines. 
Some build on the foundational courses and others introduce new areas of learning. 
Track I students take 69 hours of advanced courses while Track II students take 1 02 
hours. These courses are distributed as follows: 



Track I 
Biblical Studies 




M.Div 


Program 

Track II 




Prophets 

Old Testament area 

Gospel 

Paul 


3 
3 
3 
3 






Pentateuch or Deutero- 

nomistic History 
Prophets 
Psalms or Wisdom 


3 

3 
3 










Synoptics 

Johannine Literature 
Pauline Literature 


3 
3 
3 



Doctrinal Studies 



God 3 

Christ 3 

Church 3 

Origins and Eschatology 3 



God 3 

Christ 3 

Church 3 

Origins and Eschatology 3 



Historical Studies 



Specific period or 
movement 



27 



Academic Programs 



Ethical Studies 



Ethics area 



Ethics area 



Liturgical Studies 



Initiation or Eucharist 3 

Presiding Practicum 3 



Preaching 



Initiation 3 

Eucharist 3 

Worship Practicum I 3 

Worship Practicum II 3 



Introduction to Litur- 
gical Preaching 

Canon Law 



Introduction to Liturgical 

Preaching 3 

Preaching area . 3 



Canon Law area 



Church and Structure 3 
Sacramental Law 3 



Spirituality and Pastoral Care 



Spirituality area 3 

Pastoral Care area 3 



Spirituality area 
Pastoral Care area 
Spirituality or Pastoral 
Care area 



General Electives 1 i 

Supervised Ministry 



General Electives 



18 



Ministry Practicum II 9 

(For those exempted 
from Ministry Practicum I) 



Ministry Practicum II 



Integrative 



M.Div. Integratmg Seminar 3 



M.Div. Integrating 3 

Seminar 



28 



Academic Programs 



Concentrations 

Master of Divinity students may choose to pursue particular fields of study by focusing 
their program in one of the following areas: 

M.Div. with Bible Concentration 

The goal of this concentration is to help M.Div. students further ground their ministerial 

studies in biblical studies. 

M.Div. with Pastoral Theology Concentration 

The goal of this concentration is to provide students with the opportunity to coordinate 
their studies in ways that will enhance preparation for the general practice of ministry by 
pursuing a chosen ministerial focus from a variety of disciplines. 

M.Div. with Word and Worship Concentration 

The goal of this concentration is to provide students with further grounding and 

development in liturgy and preaching. 

M.Div. with World Mission Concentration 

The goal of this concentration, administered by the Cross-Cultural Ministries 
Department, is to enable students to give their program a mission or cross-cultural focus. 
The courses that are part of this concentration challenge all theological education at CTU 
with the reality of cultural and religious pluralism in the global Church. 

The concentrations allow students to focus about 40 per cent of their advanced courses, 
general eiectives and field education on their chosen field of interest. Interested students 
should choose an area of concentration before beginning advanced requirements. A 
complete description and the requirements of each concentration appear in the M.Div. 
Program Manual. 

Master of Arts Program (M.A.) 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. Director 

Catholic Theological Union offers two types of the Master of Arts in theology: 
the research M.A. and the general academic M.A. The M.A. program is marked by 
flexibility. The individual student's program is negotiated between the student, the 
academic advisor and the M.A. Director. It is also possible to pursue both the M.Div. 
and M.A. programs concurrently. 

Areas of Concentration 

Students may choose one of several concentrations: Old Testament, New Testament, 
biblical studies, church history, ethics, liturgy, pastoral theology, spirituality, systematic 
theology, and world mission. The requirements that are specific to each concentration 
are described in the M.A. Program Manual. 



29 



Academic Programs 



Research M.A. 

The Research M.A. provides the theological background for those who wish to prepare 
for entrance into a doctoral program, to teach at the secondary or college level or to 
develop greater academic expertise in theological studies. The program requires 36 
hours of course work (12 courses) distributed as follows: 24 hours (eight courses) in the 
area of concentration and two other courses in each of two other theological disciplines 
(12 hours). All courses are to be 400-level or above. 

All students in the Research M.A. program must have a reading knowledge of at least 
one modem language other than English (preferably German or French). Students 
concentrating in biblical studies also have to show proficiency in Hebrew and Greek. 
Those concentrating in historical and doctrinal studies need to have proficiency in Latin. 
Students should be ready to demonstrate their language competency as early as possible 
in their program. Language courses are available in the Hyde Park area. 

After course work is complete students take a two-part comprehensive examination in 
which they show their grasp of theological method and the content of the disciplines that 
were part of their program. The content and approach of the examination are described 
more fully in the M.A. Program Manual. 

The final requirement is a thesis in which students show their ability to do competent 
work in their area of concentration and give evidence of research skills and critical 
thought. 

General Academic M.A. 

The General Academic M.A. provides the theological background for those who wish to 
teach at the secondary or college level or who want to develop greater academic expertise 
in theological studies. The areas of concentration available are the same as those for the 
research M.A. 

The program consists of 45 hours of course work distributed as follows: 30 hours in the 
student's area of concentration, 12 hours in another theological discipline, and three 
hours (one course) in a third discipline. All courses are to be at the 400-level or above. 

There is no language requirement except for those who are concentrating in biblical 
studies, Old Testament or New Testament. Those students need to have a basic 
knowledge of Hebrew and Greek. 

Following completion of course work, the student will take a two-part comprehensive 
examination. The goals and content of this examination are found in the M.A. Program 
Manual. There is no thesis for the general academic M.A. 



30 



Academic Programs 



Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies Program (M.A.P.S.) 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. Director 

The Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies (M.A.P.S.) is a professional degree designed to 
enhance a person's ability to serve as a minister in the Church. Building on previous 
professional ministerial experience, this program combines theological study, a focus 
for developing pastoral skills and the integration of the two. Those who have some 
ministerial experience, those who wish to prepare for new ministries and those who want 
to improve their effectiveness in their current ministries will find this program helpful. 

While the M.Div. is meant to be initial preparation for ministry, the M.A.P.S. meets 
the special needs of those changing ministries or upgrading ministerial skills after some 
years of experience in ministry. As a program providing specific ministerial skills and 
competencies along with general theological understanding, the M.A.P.S. differs from 
the M.A. and cannot be pursued concurrently with it; however, it is possible to apply 
work done in the M.A.P.S. program toward the M.Div. program. Work done in the 
Certificate Programs can be applied toward the M.A.P.S. degree. 

Areas of Concentration 

Students can concentrate their studies in the following disciplines: biblical studies, 
liturgical studies, pastoral care, pastoral ministry, pastoral theology, spirituality, and 
world mission. Specific requirements for these concentrations are found in the M.A.P.S. 
Program Manual. 

Courses 

The course work (72 hours) in this program is distributed into three areas: the 
theological disciplines, pastoral skills, and integrative experiences. The 42 hours (14 
courses) that provide grounding in the theological disciplines are distributed as follows: 

Biblical Studies 12 hours 

Church History 3 hours 

Doctrinal Studies 12 hours 

Ethics 6 hours 

Liturgy 3 hours 

Cross-cultural Studies 3 hours 

Pastoral Studies 3 hours 

The 21 hours that aim to develop pastoral skills are distributed as follows: 
Area of Concentration 1 8 hours 

Elecfive 3 hours 

All beginning students in ministry programs are also required to take three non-credit 
workshops on issues that CTU considers important to ministry, such as professional 
standards of conduct. 



n 



Academic Programs 



Nine hours of course work involve integrative experiences. The first three hours 
comprise the M.A.P.S. Colloquium. This course, normally taken at the beginning of the 
program, helps students reflect on their previous ministerial experience. The M.A.P.S. 
Colloquium II, a second integrative experience, occurs later in the program and is a fuller 
integration of pastoral skills, theological reflection and ministerial experience. The final 
three hours are devoted to the M.A.P.S. project, which is oriented to the student's 
projected area of pastoral ministry. The complete description of this project is found in 
the M.A.P.S. Program Manual. 

Recognition of the diverse backgrounds of the adults who pursue the M.A.P.S. degree 
results in individually designed courses of study that enable students to achieve their 
objectives in the program. 

Doctor of Ministry Program (D.Min.) 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. Director 

The Doctor of Ministry Program, offered jointly by Catholic Theological Union, the 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and McCormick Theological Seminary, is 

an advanced professional degree for lay and ordained ministers. The purpose of the 

program is to help those with significant experience in ministry integrate advanced 

theological study with the development of pastoral skills to enhance the practice of 

ministry. 

Program Design 

The Joint D.Min. program balances the acquisition of content and the development of 
skills brought together in an integrated fashion. The program uses peer, supervised and 
self-directed learning experiences along with classroom instruction. 

Concentrations 

Students choose one of the following three concentrations as a focus for the D.Min. 
program: cross-cultural ministries, liturgy and spirituality. 

The cross-cultural ministries concentration centers on areas of ministry where cultural 
differences raise special challenges to pastoral and missionary activity. The 
concentration is interdisciplinary and ecumenical in scope. 

The concentration in liturgy has the goal of serving the entire worship event to make it 
more authentic and effective. It combines historical and systematic studies with pastoral 
methods to enable students to construct worship in the light of liturgical traditions and to 
assess the effectiveness of worship in particular communities. 

The concentration in spirituality is designed to enhance the reflective and pastoral skills 
of those whose ministerial goal is to foster spiritual development through leadership 
within Christian communities. The concentration emphasizes the leader's 
growth in theological, historical, and cross-cultural awareness and in pastoral expertise. 

32 



Academic Programs 



Program Structure 

The program requires 45 hours of course work (15 courses at the 500 or 600-level). 

These are distributed as follows: 

Core CoUoquia 9 hours 

Supervised Leadership Training 3 hours 

Electives 27 hours 

Thesis-Project 6 hours 

The minimum time required for completion of the program components, except the 
thesis, is one academic year plus an intensive three-week module in September. 
Preparation and approval of the thesis usually involve one academic year. Students may 
pursue the program on a part-time basis, provided they have completed Core CoUoquia I 
and II in then- first year. 

Core CoUoquia 

In the three core colloquia, students explore methodological frameworks for ministry 
from the perspective of their experience. In Core Colloquia I and II students think 
together about the nature of ministry and its methods, largely through case studies. 
Core Colloquium III prepares students to write their thesis-project. 

Supervised Leadership Training 

This component of the D.Min. program is specific to each concentration. A complete 
description of this part of the program is found in the D.Min. Program Manual. 

Electives 

The 27 hours of electives are ordinarily distributed to include 1 5 hours (five courses) in 
the area of concentration and 12 hours (four courses) outside the area. Requirements 
specific to each concentration are described in the D.Min. Program Manual. 

Thesis-Project 

Upon completion of their course work and admission to candidacy, students write a 
thesis-project. The thesis-project addresses the nature and practice of ministry in the area 
of concentration. Candidates are to identify a specific concern in ministry, bringing to 
bear both the appropriate literature and critical theological reflection and proposing a 
response. 

Evaluations 

All students are evaluated at three specific times during their program. The initial 
evaluation follows Core Colloquium II at the end of the fall quarter. Second is the 
candidacy evaluation. It assesses the student's development and prospects for successful 
completion of the program. This evaluation takes place after Core Colloquium III. The 
fmal evaluation is the approval of the completed thesis-project. A complete description 
of these evaluations can be found in the D.Min. Program Manual. 



33 



Academic Programs 



Certificate Programs 

Catholic Theological Union offers several certificate programs. These programs address 
the needs of those who want to continue their theological education or to prepare 
themselves for new ministries. Students may earn certificates in the following areas: 
Biblical Spirituality, Liturgical Studies, Pastoral Studies, Spiritual Formation and Cross- 
Cultural Mission. Certificates are awarded for 36 hours of course work (12 courses), the 
equivalent of three quarters' work. 

Certificate in Biblical Spirituality 

Barbara Bowe, R. S.C.J. Director 

The Program in Biblical Spirituality combines course work, special seminars, and prayer 
centered on the Bible as the basis of Christian living and experience. The normal 
sequence of this program begins with the fall quarter in Israel followed by the winter and 
spring quarters at CTU. Alternative ways of fulfilling the 36 hours of course work are 
possible. Students may choose from the offerings of the Biblical Literature and 
Languages Department but also from biblically related courses of other departments. 
Students have the option of extending their study for an additional year to earn the 
M.A.P.S. Credits from the certificate program are applicable to that degree program. 

Certificate in Liturgical Studies 

Richard Fragomeni Director 

This certificate requires 24 hours in the area of liturgy and 12 hours in doctrinal studies. 
The chairperson of the Word and Worship Department, who oversees this concentration, 
will consult with students to develop an individual program for each. 

Certificate in Pastoral Studies 

Keiren O'Kelly Director 

This is the most general of the certificate programs. Students can design a 

program to meet their individual needs, enrolling in any 12 courses (36 hours). Students 

can shape their program of studies in consultation with the Director of Continuing 

Education, who administers this certificate program. 

Certificate in Spiritual Formation 

Mary Frotilict] Director 

The Certificate in Spiritual Formation offers students the opportunity to design a course 
of study in spirituality and related disciplines without the constraints of a degree 
program. "Issues in Spiritual Formation," S506 and at least seven other courses in the 
spirituality or pastoral care areas are normally required. Another four courses are 
elective. This certificate program may be taken concurrently with the Claret Center 
Internship in Spiritual Direction. 

This certificate is designed to serve present and future formation directors, those who 
want an academic background for the ministry of spiritual direction or other spiritual 
ministries and others who wish to do a year's study in spirituality. 

34 



Academic Programs 



Certificate in Cross-Cultural Mission 

Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. Director 

This certificate consists of 12 courses all of which must have a "C" designation. An 
introductory course will be followed by courses in mission history, mission or cross- 
cultural methodology and one cultural area. Half of the courses are elective, giving 
the student latitude in exploring a variety of issues in theological disciplines while still 
maintaining a cross-cultural mission perspective. Returned and flirloughed missionaries 
and those preparmg for a ministry in a cross-cultural setting will find this certificate 
program helpful. 

Continuing Education Programs 

Keiren O' Kelly Director 

The Continuing Education Office offers several opportunities for professional and 
personal development. Students coming to CTU for continuing theological and 
ministerial education are free to choose courses most suited to their specific goals. The 
Certificate and Sabbatical Programs offer students a structure within which to continue 
their education. It is also possible to select courses without any programmatic structure. 

Sabbatical Program 

The Sabbatical Program provides those experienced in ministry with 
opportunities for renewal. These opportunities include the student's choice of course 
offerings, spiritual direction, theological reflection and activities of a social and cultural 
nature. Persons may enroll for the sabbatical program for either one, two, or three 
quarters and may take courses for credit or for audit. 

Tlie Summer Institute 

The aim of the Summer Institute is to provide an opportunity to enrich and enhance 
effectiveness in ministry. During the last three weeks of June, Summer Institute 
participants may choose among one-week modules. Offerings may be taken for 
academic credit or for Continuing Education Units (CEUs). Upon completion of 12 
Summer Institute courses for credit or CEUs, participants will receive a Summer Institute 
Certificate in Pastoral Studies. 

Ministers in the Vicinity 

Persons aheady engaged in full-time ministry from the Chicagoland area who complete 
the general admission requirements may audit three courses over a two-year period for a 
reduced audit rate. Application is made with the Director of Continuing Education. 
The number of participants is limited. 



35 



Academic Programs 



study in Special Areas of Ministry 

World Mission Program 

The Cross-Cultural Ministries Department oversees concentrations in World Mission in 
all degree programs. Catholic Theological Union offers a wide selection of courses 
featuring missiological dimensions in doctrinal, ethical, biblical, pastoral and liturgical 
studies, as well as courses with a cross-cultural focus that explore the dynamics of culture 
and their implications for mission and ministry. There is a special intensive to help 
people prepare for cross-cultural mission and ministry. Returned and furloughed 
missionaries often participate in the mission/ministry/spirituality integrating seminar to 
process both their experience abroad and their reentry. 

The World Mission Program supplements the degree programs. It challenges students 
and faculty with the reality of cultural and religious pluralism in the global Church and 
the theological concerns of globalization and contextualization. It encourages all to 
become people of dialogue and reconciliation as they share in the evangelizing mission 
of the Church. 

The World Mission Program sponsors an annual lecture on World Mission and regular 
Mission Focus evenings, student-led discussions about their mission and cross-cultural 
experiences. Classroom and extra-curricular activities provide opportunities for all CTU 
students to benefit from the rich diversity of international students and others with 
mission and cross-cultural experience. The World Mission Program also co-sponsors a 
variety of special mission-centered experiences with the Chicago Center for Global 
Ministries (CCGM). 

Spirituality Studies 

Catholic Theological Union offers a rich variety of options in the area of spirituality 
study. In addition to the courses offered by the Department of Spirituality and Pastoral 
Care, many other CTU courses include a concern for spiritual life and ministry. 
Sabbatical and continuing education students frequently attest that they find the 
envu-onment of CTU~including its liturgical life, cultural opportunities, availabilit>' of 
spiritual directors and companions and atmosphere of community— most conducive for 
spiritual growth and reflection. The nearby Claret Center offers spiritual direction, 
workshops and retreats, as well as the Internship in Spiritual Direction (see below). 

For those desiring more structured study in spirituality, the M.A. and D.Min. programs 
offer specially designed concentrations in this field. Students in M.A.P.S. or M.Div. 
programs can select from spirituality options for electives, ministry practica and final 
projects. Special certificate programs are available in Spiritual Formation and in 
Biblical Spirituality. For more information, contact the respective program directors. 



36 



Academic Programs 



Hispanic Ministry 

Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M. Director 

Courses in Hispanic Ministry provide theological education that is historically, culturally 
and religiously grounded in an Hispanic context and in Hispanic experience. Catholic 
Theological Union offers not only courses in Hispanic Ministry but other educational 
opportunities such as seminars, workshops, community dialogue and other special events. 
Catholic Theological Union cooperates with the Ecumenical Hispanic Resources 
Committee on Academic Cooperation in Hyde Park and with other centers in the Chicago 
area to focus effective pastoral training responsive to needs in Hispanic communities. 

Hispanic Ministry courses are directed toward Hispanic and non-Hispanic persons 
interested m ministry m Hispanic communities. Providing contact with Hispanic 
experiences and traditions of the Catholic Church in the United States, Hispanic Ministry 
courses are open to all students. 

Information about specific courses and other details is available from the director. 

Oscar Romero Scholars Program 

Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M. Director 

The Oscar Romero Program offers Hispanic lay women and men the opportunity to earn 
a graduate degree that certifies their readiness to minister in their own communities. To 
meet the need for pastoral ministers in the Hispanic/Latino community in Chicago, CTU 
co-sponsors this initiative with the Archdiocese of Chicago to develop fully credentialed 
Hispanic lay leaders who can minister in the Archdiocese of Chicago. 

Several Oscar Romero Scholarships are available for those Hispanic applicants who 
fulfill the academic prerequisites for admission to CTU, show an aptitude and capacity 
for graduate work and ministry and agree to serve in the Archdiocese of Chicago for 
three years after graduation. Besides the academic preparation, this program offers 
spiritual formation and an orientation to pastoral work in the Church of Chicago. 

Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry Program 

Jamie T. Ptielps, O.P. Director 

To meet the growmg needs of ministerial personnel within the African-American 
Catholic community in Chicago, the Archdiocese of Chicago and Catholic Theological 
Union jointly sponsor the Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry Program. For African 
Americans wishing to minister in the Archdiocese of Chicago, the program offers the 
opportunity to acquire graduate degrees in theology and ministry. 

\? 
Several Augustus Tolton Scholarships are available each year for those African- 
American students who ftilfill the academic prerequisites for admission to CTU, show 
a capacity and aptitude for ministry and graduate work and agree to serve in the 
Archdiocese of Chicago for three years after graduation. The program also offers 
students spiritual formation and orientation to pastoral work in the Church of Chicago. 

37 



Academic Programs 



The Joint African-American Ministries Program 

Michelle Bentley (Meadville/Lombard Theological School) Director 
The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools established the Joint African- 
American Ministries Program as a cooperative effort to prepare men and women for 
effective ministries in the African-American community. All students enrolled in the 
schools of the Hyde Park Cluster are eligible to participate in the program. Through a 
series of courses, field experiences and formational activities, students can enhance their 
preparation for ministry with a special focus on the African-American community. For 
more information, contact Jamie Phelps, O.P. 

Native American Ministries 

Faculty in the Cross-Cultural Ministries Department offer traveling seminars to the 
Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota twice a year. These seminars are 
an integral part of courses on Native American culture and spirituality. It is also possible 
to arrange special field placements in the Native American community in Chicago or on 
the reservations in South Dakota. Individual guidance is available to students interested 
in focusing on Native American studies. More information is available from Claude 
Marie Barbour. 

Institute for Liturgical Consultants 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. Director 

The Institute for Liturgical Consultants prepares participants to serve as consultants for 
the building or renovation of places of worship. Applicants should have a professional 
background in art, architecture or liturgy. Participants meet for a two-to-three week 
intensive during two consecutive summers, follow a program of independent 
study tailored to their needs during the following academic year, participate in one mid- 
year conference each year and serve an apprenticeship with a practicing liturgical 
consultant during their second year in the program. Co-sponsored by CTU and the 
Chicago Archdiocesan Office for Divine Worship, and Liturgy Training Publications, the 
Institute begins a new group every third year (1996, 1999, 2002). 

Off-Campus Study 

Catholic Theological Union offers several opportunities for off-campus study in the 
Chicago area and beyond. To accommodate degree program students and those looking 
for theological enrichment, Catholic Theological Union offers courses each quarter at 
satellite locations in the Chicagoland area. Current satellite locations include Joliet, 
Illinois and Gary, Indiana. Students may take course at the satellites for credit or for 
Continuing Education Units (CEUs). 

The Israel Study Programs 

Marianne Race, C.S.J. , Director 

The Israel Study Programs offer students the opportunity to study the Bible in context. 

These programs are academic in orientation, fully credited and led by members of the 

38 



Academic Programs 



Biblical Literature and Languages Department. Schedule for the programs and other 
information are available from the Director of the Israel Study Programs. 

Fall Israel Study Program 

This is a quarter-long program that combines biblical study with visits to historical and 
archaeological sites in Greece, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Egypt. Students earn credits 
(four courses), which fulfill the biblical requirements of degree or certificate programs. 
Following the overseas portion of the program, there is an optional reentry seminar 
conducted at CTU that helps students to relate their experiences in the land of the Bible 
to theology, spirituality, and ministry. 

Spring Israel Study Program 

In odd-numbered years, CTU offers a three-week study tour of Israel and Jordan. 
Though not required of all participants, a spring quarter course (B 475 History and 
Archaeology of Israel) is offered at CTU and is recommended as an excellent 
preparation for the study tour that begins toward the end of that quarter. Students may 
earn credits applicable to degree or certificate programs. 

The Turkey-Greece Programs 

Offered in odd-numbered years, this study tour of approximately two weeks focuses on 
the origins of early Christianity. It is distinct from the Spring Israel Program but follows 
it directly and may be taken in conjunction with it. 

The Israel Retreat 

Each August CTU offers a 20-day spiritual retreat in Israel. Conferences develop the 
religious impact of the biblical and archaeological memories of sites visited. A portion 
of each day is spent visiting biblical sites for reflection and prayer. 

Overseas Training Program (OTP) 

The Overseas Training Program is a supervised missionary-pastoral experience in a 
cross-cultural situation that has a period of language and cultural studies of at least one 
year of direct ministry with supervision. In dialogue with the Cross-Cultural Ministry 
Department, participating religious communities at CTU who have students in the OTP 
have the responsibility of organizing and administering the program for their students. 
Independent students plan their programs directly with the CCM Department. For more 
information contact the chair of the CCM Department. 

Louvain Study 

Students from CTU may spend one or two semesters studying in the English- 
speaking section of the Theological Faculty of the Catholic University of Louvain 
(Belgium). The specific details of this program are available from the Academic Dean. 



3# 



Academic Programs 



Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies (TICCS) 

In cooperation with the TICCS, Catholic Theological Union offers students the 
opportunity to participate in a nine-week summer program in Ghana. The program, 
which extends from mid- June to mid-August each year, includes a one-week cultural 
orientation, three weeks of intensive study of language, culture, and ministry 
methodology, four weeks of immersion into traditional village life and one week of 
debriefing and evaluation. Students may earn up to six credit hours. Further information 
is available from Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D., the chairperson of the Department of 
Cross-Cultural Ministries. 

Claret Center Internship in Spiritual Direction 

The Claret Center, located in Hyde Park, offers a nine-month internship in spiritual 
direction. The internship program meets one day per week and can be combined with 
other course work and/or employment. M.A.P.S. and M.Div. students who complete the 
internship may apply for three credits. M.Div. students may request the internship as 
their Ministry Practicum II placement. Continuing education students may also be able 
to make use of this resource. Interested students must apply and be accepted by the 
Claret Center. Further information is available from Mary Frohlich, chair of the 
Spirituality and Pastoral Care Department. 

National Capital Semester for Seminarians 

Catholic Theological Union participates in the National Capital Semester for 
Seminarians, directed by Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C. Students 
spend a semester focusing on public policy and theology through study, reflection, direct 
political action and meeting with persons involved in the political process. Further 
information is available from the Director of the M.Div. Program. 

United Nations and World Faiths 

Catholic Theological Union participates in the United Nations and World Faiths program 
of Long Island University. Students engage in a semester of study in New York, 
exploring the partnership of churches and the United Nations in promoting world 
peace, human rights and social development. Further information is available from the 
Director of the M.Div. Program. 

Sheptytsky Institute in Eastern Christian Studies 

The Sheptytsky Institute is a month- long summer program that integrates study of 
Eastern Christianity's theology, liturgy and spirituality with an experience of Eastern 
monastic life at Holy Transfiguration Monastery at Redwood Valley, California. The 
Institute was founded at CTU in 1986 and its summer program remains affiliated with 
CTU though its headquarters are now at St. Paul's University in Ottawa. Students can 
earn six credits applicable to the M.Div., M.A. or M.A.P.S. degrees. Further information 
about the Institute is available from the Office of the Academic Dean. 



40 



Academic Programs 



The Institute for Black Catholic Studies 

Students interested in understanding the African-American community or ministering 
within it can study in the Summer Institute for Black CathoHc Studies at Xavier 
University, New Orleans. The Institute sponsors the only Catholic program offering the 
Master of Theology degree (Th.M.) from an Afrocentric perspective. In addition to work 
in the theological disciplines, the institute offers certificates in youth ministry and 
catechetics and courses in lay leadership. Students have the option of transferring six 
credits from the institute into CTU or completing a second master's degree through the 
institute. Further information is available from Jamie T. Phelps, O.P. 



41 



42 






Academic information 



43 



Academic Information 



ADMISSIONS POLICIES 

The academic programs of Catholic Theological Union are open to all qualified students 
who wish to prepare for ministry in the Roman Catholic tradition. Applications for 
admission are available from the Director of Recruitment and Admissions. Application 
procedures should be completed six weeks before the date of enrollment. 

General Admissions Requirements 

1. A bachelor's degree or its equivalent from an approved college or university. 
Students without a baccalaureate degree or its equivalent can be admitted as special 
students under certain conditions. 

2. A completed application form. 

3 . Payment of a non-refundable application fee. 

4. CTU reserves the right to require a formal evaluation of applicants and a personal 
interview with admissions officials. 

Specific Admissions Requirements 

M.Div. Program 

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, applicants for the M.Div. 
program should normally have a liberal arts background, including courses in philosophy 
and undergraduate theology. Specific admission requirements include: 

1 . Three letters of recommendation from persons who can attest to the 
applicant's suitability for graduate study and ministry. Note: Applicants 
from participating religious communities are not required to submit these 
letters since sponsorship by a participating community constitutes adequate 
recommendation. If the community withdraws its sponsorship or if the 
student leaves the community, CTU requires the presentation of a new 
application with letters of recommendation, one of which must come from 
an official representative of the former community. 

2. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended by the 
applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the registrars of these schools 
directly to CTU. 

3. Academic prerequisites: Track I Prerequisites 

effective Fall 1997: l 
TRACK I 3 courses philosophy ! 

15 semester hours of philosophy No theology prerequisite 

9 semester hours of undergraduate i 

TRACKII - '■ 

24 semester hours of philosophy 

12 semester hours of undergraduate theology 

Note: Some prerequisites in philosophy and undergraduate theology may be made up at 
CTU. Consult the M.Div. Director for more information. 

44 . 



Academic Information 



M.A. Program 

1. Three letters of recommendation from persons who can attest to the 
apphcant's suitabiHty for graduate study. Note: Applicants from 
participating religious communities are not required to submit these letters. 

2. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended by the 
applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the registrars of these schools 
directly to CTU. 

3. An undergraduate major in theology or religious studies, 24 quarter hours 
(18 semester hours) in theology or demonstration of equivalent preparation. 
Note: Prerequisites can be made up by taking 300-level courses at CTU. 
Please consult the M.A. Director for details. 

4. A background in philosophy sufficient for the understanding of theology. 
Some prerequisites can be made up at CTU. 

M.A.P.S. Program 

1. Three letters of recommendation, from persons who can attest to the 
applicant's suitability for graduate study and ministry. Note: Applicants 
from participating religious communities are not required to submit these 
letters. 

2. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended by the 
applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the registrars of these schools 
directly to CTU. 

3. Some background in theology, philosophy, psychology and sociology is 
recommended. 

4. Three years of experience in communicating religious values to others. 

D.Min. Program 

1 . The M.Div. degree or the equivalent of three years of graduate theological 
studies with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. 

2. Five years of full-time ministry ordinarily following the applicant's first 
ministerial degree. 

3. The submission of a detailed curriculum vitae. 

4. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended by the 
applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the registrars of these schools 
directly to the Director of the D.Min. program. 

5. A 1500-word essay that includes a statement of the applicant's personal 
goals in ministry, a descriptive self-assessment of the applicant's ministry, 
and an annotated list of readings in theology and ministry over the last two 
years. 

6. Three letters of recommendation, including one from an ecclesiastical 
superior and one attesting to the applicant's academic ability. 

Note: The deadline for completing the D.Min. application is March 15. 



45 



Academic Information 



Certificate Programs and Continuing Education 

1. An official transcript from one post-secondary school. The transcript 
should be from a degree-granting school or graduate school. 

2. One letter of recommendation from someone who can attest to the person's 
ability to undertake graduate study. 

Note: Upon admission, students must be in compliance with immunization 
requirements of the State of Illinois. Further information is available from the 
Dean of Students and Community Services. 

International Applicants 

1 . In addition to meeting admission requirements, applicants from outside the 
United States who do not hold a U.S. Passport must submit a letter of 
financial support or personal guarantee of payment. 

2. Applicants whose first language is not English and do not hold an 
advanced degree based on the completion of written and oral work in 
English are to complete the "Test of English as a Foreign Language" 
(TOEFL). Scores from this assessment tool help CTU offer students 
appropriate academic advisement. 

Information regarding TOEFL is available from Test of English as a Foreign 
Language, FOB 6151; Princeton, NJ 08541-6151. Applicants from places 
where the TOEFL is not available or where it is prohibitively expensive may be 
accepted to CTU conditionally prior to testing, which will ordinarily take place 
during a student's first quarter of study. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES 
Student Classification 

Students are admitted to degree programs after completion of admission requirements 
and pre-requisites of the respective programs. They are candidates for the degree after 
completing the procedures listed in the respective degree manuals. Continuing education 
students are students who are enrolled in CTU but are not seeking a degree. Special 
students are those without a baccalaureate degree or its equivalent. 

Catholic Theological Union follows the quarter system along with the other institutions 
of the Association of Chicago Theological Schools. There are eleven weeks in each 
quarter- 10 weeks of instruction and the eleventh is a reading and examination week. 
The normal course load is 12 credit hours per quarter though students enrolling for at 
least nine hours per quarter are considered full-time students. Students who register for 
less than nine credits in any quarter are part-time students. Auditors are students who 
enroll in courses but do not take them for credit. 

Program Directors 

Each academic program has a director who is responsible for general oversight 
of the program. The program director insures that the program's regulations and 
procedures are followed by students enrolled in the programs. 

46 



Academic Information 



Program Manuals 

There is a program manual for each degree program. It is available from the program 
director. Copies are also available in the library. The manuals provide complete 
academic information and the official regulations and procedures specific to each 
program. Students are responsible for becoming acquainted with the manual of the 
degree they are pursuing. 

Academic Advisors 

Each student will be assigned an academic advisor from the faculty. While the academic 
advisor is to monitor the student's progress, it is the student who is responsible for 
meeting all requirements for graduation according to the specifications of the appropriate 
program manual. 

Registration 

All students are to complete their registration and arrange for payment of fees at the time 
and place announced by the registrar, who will provide detailed instructions for 
registration. Students are to plan their registration by consulting their academic advisors. 
The advisor's signature must appear on registration forms before the registrar can accept 
them. The academic advisor and the faculty involved must also approve any change in 
the student's course selection, using a form the student will secure from the registrar. 
Adding or dropping courses is allowed through the first week of the quarter without 
academic or financial penalty. . .: 

Auditing Courses 

Instructors may permit auditors to attend their courses. While auditors may participate in 
class discussions, instructors are not required to evaluate any written work from them nor 
are auditors required to take tests or examinations. While audit courses are listed on the 
student's permanent record, no grade is given. Space for auditors may be limited in some 
courses. Permission of the academic advisor and the instructor involved is necessary to 
change from credit to audit. More information about changing status is available from 
the registrar. 

Withdrawals 

Students may withdraw from any course up to the end of the seventh week of 
the quarter. They are to secure the withdrawal form from the registrar and seek the 
approval of their academic advisor and the faculty member involved. Withdrawals after 
the seventh week will be noted on the student's record as either "Withdrew Passing" 
(WT) or "Withdrew Failing" (WF). 

Independent Study 

Opportunities for independent study make it possible for students to pursue interests not 
covered by regular course offerings. Interested students may contact a member of the 



47 



Academic Information 



faculty who will define learning tasks and course requirements. Students are responsible 
for completing the necessary form before registration. This form is available from the 
registrar. Courses that are regiilarly offered are not normally taken as an independent 
study. Independent studies must be taken for credit. Accepting responsibility for 
supervising independent studies is left to the discretion of faculty members. 

Extensions and incompletes 

Each instructor sets the deadline for the submission of all course work. Students must 

petition the instructor to receive an incomplete (I), a grade that denotes that the work for 

a course has not been completed by the deadline. Students are to remove an incomplete 

by the end of the following quarter. If the student fails to do so, the instructor will give 

either a "Failure" (F) or a "Permanent Incomplete" (PI). In either case, no credit is given 

and the course must be repeated if it is a required course. 

Students must secure the petition for extension form from the registrar, who can provide 

additional information on the policies and procedures on incompletes. The granting of 

extensions and incompletes is the sole prerogative of the instructor. No instructor is 

required to grant an extension. 

Incompletes cannot be given by visiting instructors or by instructors who will be on 

sabbatical leave the following quarter. 

Students who have two incompletes or who are on academic probation must consult with 

the Academic Dean before registration. 

Grades 

The instructor is solely responsible for evaluating the course work of students and 
assigning grades. At the end of each quarter, the student will receive a grade report 
which will list the total hours accumulated and the cumulative grade point average. The 
registrar is responsible for distributing the grade reports. 

Instructors assign a letter grade unless the course follows a pass-fail system. The 
registrar uses a numerical system to compute the student's grade point average 
according to the following scale: 



A range: 


Excellent work 


B range 


: Good work 


C range: Fair work 


A+ 


4.00 


B+ 


3.50 


C+ 2.50 


A 


4.00 


B 


3.00 


C 2.00 


A- 


3.75 


B- 


2.75 


C- 1.75 


D 1.00 


Poor 








F 


Fail 








P 


Pass 








WP 


Withdrew Passing 








WF 


Withdrew Failing 








I 


Incomplete 








PI 


Permanent Incomplete 








N 


No Grade 









48 



Academic Information 



Academic Probation 

Students in degree programs must maintain a 3.0 Cumulative Grade Point Average 
[CGA] to graduate. Students whose CGAs fall below 3.0 in two successive 
quarters are subject to academic probation. Students failing to show improvement are 
subject to dismissal. More information about academic probation is available from the 
Academic Dean. CTU reserves the right to dismiss students whose academic progress or 
adjustment to the school is unsatisfactory. Students who are dismissed for academic 
reasons cannot be readmitted to a degree program. 

Advanced Standing 

Students beginning the M.Div. and M.A.P.S. programs may petition to receive advanced 
standing for previous work in foundational (300-level) courses. Students should consult 
with their respective program directors. If the petition is granted, the hours in those 
foundational areas become elective. 

Credit by Examination 

Students in the M.Div. and M.A.P.S. may petition to receive credit by examination in 
many foundational areas and some advanced areas in their respective programs. 
Interested students may consult their respective program manuals and directors. 

Transfer of Credit 

Previously earned graduate credit in theology may be transferred to Catholic Theological 
Union if this work earned at least the grade of "B." Ordinarily no more than nine quarter 
hours may be transferred into the M.A. and M.A.P.S. programs and no more than 36 
quarter hours into the M.Div. Program. Students wishing to transfer credits to CTU must 
consult with their program directors. Forms for this purpose are available from the 
registrar's office. Such credits will be recognized only after students have successfully 
completed one year of academic work. Courses taken as part of CTU-approved 
cooperative programs will not be counted as transfer credit. 

Credit by Cross-Registration 

Students enrolled at Catholic Theological Union may take courses at any of the other 
members of the Association of Chicago Theological Schools at no extra charge and at 
the University of Chicago with a significant reduction in tuition. Credit for courses 
taken in these schools may be applied to CTU degree requirements. Students are 
encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity. Up to one-third of a student's work 
may be done in these schools; by special arrangement this may be increased to one-half 

Transfer of Courses Taken after Matriculation at CTU 

After matriculation, students are expected to take courses for their degrees at CTU, 
one of the ACTS schools, or the University of Chicago. If a student wishes to take 
a course elsewhere for credit toward a CTU degree, permission must be obtained in 
advance. Students are to consult their respective program manuals and directors for 
the appropriate procedures. 

49 



Academic Information 



Grievances 

There are times in the life of any institution when conflicts may arise. The Student 
Handbook has a detailed description of the grievance procedures that deal with such 
circumstances. These procedures have been designed to protect the student, the 
instructor and the administration in the resolution of the grievance. 

Graduation 

Students who anticipate completing all the requirements of their degree or certificate 
programs in a particular year must apply for graduation with the registrar during the fall 
quarter of the academic year they intend to graduate. Students are responsible for 
completing all requirements of their degree program. Degrees are granted by the Board 
of Trustees upon recommendation of the faculty. 

Transcripts 

A student may request in writing that the registrar send an academic transcript to 
designated persons or institutions. No transcripts are sent without a written request and 
only when all accounts are paid. The first transcript is sent free of charge. For all others, 
payment of the fee must accompany the request. (See fee insert for details.) 




CTU offers an array of learning opportunities— -four degree progranns; five certificate programs; a range of 
continuing education offerings; special programs (World Mission, Spirituality, Augustus Tolton and Oscar Romero) 
and study in locations sucti as Israel, Belgium, Ghana, Wastiington, DC. and the UN in New York. 



50 



Course Offerings 



51 



Course Offerings 



This list of courses is representative of those taught at Catholic Theological Union. 
Actual courses offered may differ from those listed. 

Before the title of each course a letter or letters with a number appear. The letter 
signifies the field of study. Sometimes a course will have two letters to show that the 
course is related to two fields of study. A course designated by a combination of letters 
satisfies the requirements of each of the areas designated, e.g., BW 574 may be used for a 
course in the area of Bible or Word and Worship. 

B = Biblical Studies 

C = Cross-Cultural Studies 

D = Doctrinal Studies 

E = Ethical Studies 

H = Historical Studies 

I = Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 

M = Ministerial Studies 

MP= Ministry related to Pastoral Care 

MV\/= Ministry related to Word and Worship 

S = Spirituality Studies 

W= Word and Worship Studies 

I = Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 

The number of each course reflects the level of instruction. Courses in the 300-range are 
foundational courses. Those in the 400-range are intermediate level course that are 
generally core courses of the various Masters-level programs. The 500-level offerings 
are elective, advanced courses: seminars and classes focused on special questions. 
Courses designed for the D.Min. Program are 600-level. 




The faculty: student ratio is 7:1 -students receive personal attention and are active in classroom 
discussions. 



52 



Course Offerings 



Department of Biblical Literature and Languages (BLL) 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A., Barbara Bowe, R.S.C.J., Leslie Hoppe, O.F.M., Carolyn Osiek, R.S.C.J., 
Hayim Perelmuter, Marianne Race, C.S.J. , Barbara Reid, O.P. (chair), Donald Senior, C.P. Adjunct 
Faculty: Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. 

Note: An "I" after the course number indicates that the course number is taught in 
Jerusalem as part of the Fall Israel Study Program. 

B 300 Old Testament Introduction 

A study of the traditions and literature of ancient Israel against their historical and 
cultural background. Attention will also be given to some of the literary and theological 
issues involved in biblical interpretation. 

B 305 New Testament Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament in their historical, cultural, religious and social 
context. Introduction to methodological tools employed in New Testament research and 
to diverse theologies that comprise the New Testament witness to Jesus of Nazareth. 

B320 Biblical Greek I 

A basic introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. 

B321 Biblical Greek II 

A continuation of B 320, introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New 
Testament. Students will begin to read portions of the NT text in Greek with 
introductory attention to exegesis. 

B 325 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I 

This is the first part of a two-quarter course which studies the grammar and vocabulary 
of biblical Hebrew in order to prepare students to work with the Hebrew text. 

B 326 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II 

This is the second part of a two-quarter course which studies the grammar and 
vocabulary of biblical Hebrew in order to prepare students to work with the Hebrew text. 

B400 Pentateuch 

A study of the literary origins and development of the traditions and themes of the 
Pentateuch in light of their miportance for ancient Israel's theology. Attention will be 
given to questions of interpretation. 

B 405 Deuteronomistic History 

A study of the story of ancient Israel's life in its land as told in the Books of Joshua, 
Judges, Samuel and Kings. Emphasis on the theological perspectives of the literature and 
on archaeological background. 

53 



Course Offerings 



B407I Jerusalem: The Holy City 

A study of Jerusalem's role in the theologies found in the Bible, early Jewish literature, 
and the Islamic tradition. 

B 4081 Biblical Theologies of the Land 

A study of the diverse ways in which Israel viewed "the Land" throughout its history and 
constructed different theologies to express these views. A careful examination of 
selected texts from the Old Testament traditions, geographical and topographical data, 
and questions of the struggles for the land throughout Israel's history. 

B410 Early Prophecy 

A study of selected texts from pre-exilic prophets. Emphasis on the prophet's call and the 
relationship of prophecy to Israel's religious traditions and social institutions. 

B415 Later Prophecy 

A study of selected texts from exilic and post-exilic prophets. Emphasis on the 
relationship of prophecy to ancient Israel's social and religious institutions, 

B417 Intertestamental Literature 

A survey of noncanonical Jewish literature produced from 200 B.C. to A.D. 200. 

B420 Psalms 

Psalms are studied from each literary or liturgical category for language, form and 
theology. Their presence in traditions of Israel and the New Testament is explored. 
Helpful for students of liturgy and spirituality or for a review of Israel's religion. 

B 425 Wisdom Literature 

A study of the wisdom theology with its emphasis on human behavior. Primary focus 
will be on the themes of creation, suffering, birth and death, retribution and immortality 
as found within the wisdom literature. 

B 430 The Gospel according to Matthew 

A study of the context, structure and major motifs of the Gospel of Matthew. Particular 
attention will be given to the evangelist's role as an interpreter of tradition and history for 
a community in transition. 

B 432 The Gospel according to Mark 

A study of the Gospel of Mark with attention to its structure, major themes and key 
theological motifs, especially the link between the Passion of Jesus and Christian 
discipleship. 

B 4341 Gospel Portraits 

Selected texts from the four gospels in conjunction with visits to biblical sites, to provide 
a portrait of Jesus' life and ministry within his Jewish heritage in the context of first- 
century Palestine. 

54 



Course Offerings 



B 435 The Gospel according to Luke 

A study of the Third Gospel and its major theological themes. Particular focus on Luke's 
christology and portrayal of discipleship for women and men followers of "the Way." 

B 440 The Gospel according to John 

A study of the Gospel of John with attention to its distinctive style and theology, its 
overall structure and content. Key sections will be used to highlight such major 
Johannine motifs as religious symbolism, sacraments, community and spirituality. 

B 441 The Gospel of John from the Greek Text 

A study of the Gospel of John with attention to its distinctive style and theology, its 
overall structure and content. Prerequisite: elementary Greek 

B 452 Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought of Paul in his cultural and theological setting examined in selected 
letters, with a view to their message for the contemporary Church. , . 

B 457 The Shorter Pauline Letters 

In-depth study of Philippians, Thessalonians, and Philemon in their historical, social, 
literary and theological context. 

BW 465 Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

An overview of the worship forms in the contemporary American synagogue with special 
reference to the common thread and variations in the Jewish denominations: Orthodox, 
Conservative and Reform, and to historical backgrounds. (This course is sponsored by 
the Jewish Chautauqua Society.) 

BW 466 Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

The liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Sukkot and their 
theological implications. In addition to examining the core structure, special attention 
will be given to the Piyyutim (religious poetry). 

B 475 History and Archaeology of Israel 

Studies stages of Israel's religious, cultural and political history; geographical context of 
Israel and the Bible; history and methodology of biblical archaeology. Preparation for 
the three-week visit to Israel (B 502). Open to all interested students. 

B 4761 History and Archaeology of the Old Testament 

An inquiry into some of the nonliterary sources for reconstructing ancient Israel's history. 
The study of the prmciples of archaeology is complemented by visits to archaeological 

sites in Israel. 

\' 

B 4771 History and Archaeology of the New Testament 

Study of the religious, cultural, geographic, historical and political background of the 
New Testament world. Introduction to methods of biblical archaeology for interpreting 
material remains of early Christianity. 



55 



Course Offerings 



SB 480 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The religions of Israel and early Christianity are investigated not only in their historical 
and biblical setting but also in their impact on Christian life and ministry. (May 
substitute for B 300 for students with biblical or ministerial background.) 

B 482 The Eucharist in the New Testament 

Investigating the Eucharist's origins and development in the New Testament period, this 
course will focus on historical questions and on the literary and pastoral presentation of 
the Eucharist in writings of the New Testament. It will also address the way our findings 
challenge the today's Church regarding inculturation and social justice. 

B 492 Sickness, Disability and Healing 

Old and New Testament traditions, as well as perspectives from anthropology and 
medicine, will be examined as a means of reflecting on contemporary attitudes to these 
experiences and developing informed pastoral response. 

B 502 Traveling Seminar to Israel 

A three-week overseas intensive in Israel (May 25 to June 15), with guided exploration 
of biblical and historical sites. (Three quarter credits.) Prerequisite: B 475 

HB 505 Topics in the History of New Testament Exegesis 

An analysis of some of the ways in which the Gospels and the Pauline letters were 
interpreted in the ancient and medieval Church. 

B 506 Messianic Expectations 

A seminar on messianism as it developed in ancient Israel and early Judaism in light of 
the Christian confession of Jesus as the Messiah. May substitute for B 417. 

DB 515 The Bible: A Problem for Christianity? 

An examination of the problems posed for Christianity, and in particular Christian 
theology, by modem historical-critical study of the Bible and modem science. 

B 525 Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus' Jewish Background 

Designed to deepen the student's understanding of the relationship of early Christianity to 
rabbinic Judaism and to develop a capacity to interpret Jewish sources from Talmud and 
Midrash, this course examines the nature of rabbinic Judaism. 

B 532 The Passion Narratives 

A comparative study of the Passion Narratives of the four Gospels, demonstrating 
various approaches to biblical interpretation. 

B 533 Parables 

A study of the dynamics of the gospel parables as stories challenging the hearer to 
conversion. Includes various methods of parable interpretation and insights into 
preaching and teaching parabolically. 

56 



Course Offerings 



B 537 Women in the Gospel of Luke 

A seminar on the passages in the Gospel of Luke in which women figure. Includes 
women in the infancy narratives, Galilean women followers and ministers, women in 
Jesus' teaching. Method will be both historical-critical and feminist-liberationist. 

B 541 Fundamentalist Biblical Interpretation 

A seminar focusing on the origins of fiindamentalism and its approach to biblical 
interpretation with an attempt to formulate a pastoral response to the theological stance 
and proselytizing efforts of fundamentalists. 

B 542 Social Study of the New Testament 

Study of the methods and results engendered by this new approach, introduction to the 
ways in which sociology and cultural anthropology are used, and assessment of the 
helpfuhiess of the methods to contemporary interpretation of the New Testament. 

B 548 Old Testament Seminar 

This seminar will treat questions regarding methods of biblical interpretation and biblical 
theology. 

BW 574 Feminist Hermeneutics and Worship 

Exploration through reading, discussion and ritual of how women's changing experience 
is transforming their faith and faith expressions. 

BD 580 Feminist Hermeneutics in Bible and Theology 

A seminar that investigates biblical texts and doctrinal themes from a feminist 
perspective. 

BC 581 Forms and Meanings in Bible and Culture 

This seminar examines recurring themes in culture and the Old Testament to see what 
light each can cast on the other and on the missionary and theological enterprises. Topics 
may include kinship, power, language and ideas of God. 

B 584 Israel Reentry Seminar 

A 10-day conclusion to the Fall Israel Program designed to help participants relate their 
overseas experience to then- ongoing life and ministry. Restricted to participants from 
any of the CTU Israel Programs. 

B 585 Integrating Seminar: Biblical Spirituality Program 

Meets weekly for 2 1/2 hours to integrate experience in Israel and courses at CTU, 
ministerial background and personal ideals and contemporary questions for a holistic 
biblical spirituality. Restricted to participants from any of the CTU Israel Programs. 

B 597 Independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 



57 



Course Offerings 



SB 629 Jewish Mysticism, Messianism and Spirituality 

The mystical substratum of Jewish experience examined by a study of its development 
from the third pre-Christian century to the modem era, including Qumran, messianic 
movements and Hasidism. The landmark work of Gershom Scholem is carefully 
examined. 

Department of Cross Cultural Ministries (CCM) 

Claude Marie Barbour, Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp., John Kaserow, M.M., Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M., 
Gaiy Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. (chair). Adjunct: Eleanor Doidge, L.o.B., Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. 

C 300 Experience of Religion 

Students will be encouraged to appreciate the unfamiliar and the cross-cultural elements 
in religions. Authentic ministry demands empathy and understanding of other people's 
reality. Not easily achievable, such understanding is possible to undertake. 

OH 325 Models of Missionary Activity 

A survey of the variety of forms of missionary activity in the Church's history from the 
Apologists m the Roman Empire to the classical image of the nineteenth century 
missionary. The relevance of these models for mission today is also considered. 

EC 402 Natural Law and Christian Ethics 

A study of the relevance of some Western and non- Western Natural Law traditions m 
view of arriving at a vision of a universal common good that can generate a Christian 
ethical discourse capable of intercultural and interreligious communication. 

EC 406 Ethical Significance of Christian Humanism 

A critical study of the debate about the existence and nature of Christian humanism and 
its relevance for the ethos and mission of the Church. 

C410 Mission: The Contemporary Challenge 

What are the implications of the call to mission for every Christian? This course 
examines mission at the limits of our culture and religious experience, calling for 
transformation and conversion. 

EC 410 Proclaiming Shalom in a Violent World 

How does the Church understand and actuate its mediatory role between God's offer of 
peace in Christ and the search for peace on the part of the human community? The 
question will be approached both historically and systemically. 

C 41 1 Gifts and Strangers 

Missionaries must learn to understand their new environment and the subtle relationship 
with their hosts; being a stranger is not easy. This course considers culture, language and 
belief and the impact of missionaries. 

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Course Offerings 



CS418 Native American Spirituality 

Mitakuye oyas'in means "all my relatives" or "I am related to all that is." Guided by 
Lakota elders we will discover the meaning of this Lakota prayer and its relationship to 
ecology, justice and global spirituality. A week-long field trip to the Rosebud and Pine 
Ridge Reservations in South Dakota will be offered. 

CH 420 Modern Mission History 

This is study of the exciting and challenging period of modem mission history in the 
Roman Catholic Church from the end of the French Revolution through the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries to the present day. 

EC 422 Global Economic Justice and the Church 

We dare not provide an ethic of economic life that is not in strict relation to an ethic of 
political life and an ethic of communication. A Christian ethic must test its claims to 
normativity by the difference it makes for these interrelationships. 

EC 425 World Poverty, Development and Life's Liberation 

Investigates and assesses the world's division into rich and poor countries. Studies 
poverty, development and liberation in the light of Scripture and Catholic social teaching 
using today's kairos for Christian communities as focus. ) 

DC 441 Christology and Cultures 

A study of how the confession of Jesus Christ interacts with cultural processes. Special 
attention is given to the New Testament and patristic periods and also to contemporary 
movements in the world Church. 

DC 442 Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry 

Studies Jesus the Christ revealed through Scripture, tradition, and theological 
scholarship, to help students understand the meaning of Jesus Christ for their personal 
life, contemporary society and as ground for mission or pastoral practice. 

DC 446 Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

This course critically examines the theological and biblical foundations of the missionary 
nature of the Church and major challenges facing that issue today, e.g., inculturation, 
evangelization, social justice and prophetic witness. 

CW 451 Eucharist in Cross-Cultural Context 

Anthropological-liturgical study of Eucharist to uncover possible universals for relating 
Western eucharistic tradition to symbolism and life-experience of other cultures and to 
sketch issues and principles for shaping Eucharist cross-culturally. 

CD 454 Hacia una eclesiologia desde la perspectiva hispana 

Se busca el rol de la comunidad hispana como iglesia dentro de los EEUU por analizar su 
contexto social y su eclesiologia incipiente en dialogo con las fuentes tradicionales 
eclesiolgicas. 

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Course Offerings 



CD 455 Toward an Hispanic Theology of Church 

This course explores the particular role of the Hispanic community as Church in the 
United States by analyzing its socio-political context and incipient ecclesiology in 
dialogue with traditional ecclesiological sources. 

CD 456 God Images in Hispanic Religiosity 

This course explores the meaning behind God images in Meso-American religion and 
Mexican popular religiosity in dialogue with Western classical and feminist theologies. 

C 457 Guadalupe: Evangelizer of the Americas 

A study of the significance of Guadalupe in light of the evangelization methods of 
Spanish missionaries. Participants engage in research on missionary practices and the 
evangelizing role of Guadalupe. 

CS 459 Origins of Hispanic Popular Religiosity 

An examination of Hispanic popular religiosity, a frequently misunderstood 
phenomenon. The course will study its Latin American roots and other influences that 
have shaped Hispanic religiosity in the United States. 

C 460 Training for Cross-Cultural Mission and Ministry 

Designed to prepare for cross-cultural and global ministry and mission, using Paulo 
Freire's methodology to provide theological, spiritual, experiential dimensions and 
ecumenical/interfaith dialogue. Optional field trip to Lakota Reservations in South 
Dakota. 

C 462 Voice of Hispanic Women Theologians 

A study of theological works produced by Hispanic women and an exploration of their 
significance in the articulation of Hispanic theology. 

C 465 Toward a Theology of Ministry in the Hispanic Community 

An exploration of the historical and theological forces that have shaped the concept of 
ministry among Hispanic Catholic leadership in the United States over the last 20 years. 

C 470 Mission in Reverse: Theory and Praxis 

This approach to mission, raison d'etre and methodology will be studied through 
research, readings and visits to local communities to help participants develop their 
theory and praxis of mission and ministry. 

C 508 Mission Trends: Recent Theology 

An historical overview of theologies of mission is followed by concentration on current 
theological issues in ecumenical mission. Concludes with a look at developing trends 
and emerging paradigms. 

CW 511 Religious Experience of Initiation 

Through a study of Christian initiation and Melanesian traditional initiation, both as 
religious-cultural phenomena, this seminar focuses on the theological, cultural and 
pastoral issues in the holistic process of contextualizing initiation. 

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Course Offerings 



CS 519 Toward a Spirituality for Missionaries 

A search for an appropriate, practicable and holistic spirituality through participants' 
reflection on mission realities such as marginalization, poverty, embodiment, violence 
and burnout. 

CH 525 Early Christianity in Asia 

This course investigates earliest contacts of Christians with Asian traditions. 
It distinguishes facts, hypotheses and legends as a framework for assessing the 
significance of such contacts. 

MPC 525 Empathy in a Cross-Cultural Context 

This seminar explores theoretical and practical difficulties and possibilities of empathy as 
a way of communicating understanding across cultures. Role play and case studies will 
be used to enhance the participant's empathic capacity across cultures. 

CMP 541 Marriage and Family in a Cross-Cultural Context 

Marriage and family are building blocks of the Christian community. Still, across 
cultures there are diverse forms and patterns. Pastoral care and anthropology combine to 
uncover new insights and applications for pastors and missionaries. 

EC 545 Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience 

An exploration of the relation of Christian life to political life. The origin, place and role 
of conscience in both is investigated. Conscience will be related to the historical realities 
of community and traditions and to the unity of theory and practice proper to political 
conscience. 

C 546 African Traditional Religions 

Inculturation depends on understanding and respect for local conditions. This course 
examines major themes and motifs of African religions. We consider them as systems 
and seek a "fit" between the gospel and cultures. 

C 548 Witchcraft and Sorcery in Pastoral Perspective 

An examination of the sociological reality designated as "sorcery" or "witchcraft." The 
seminar will study a way of thinking and acting that constitutes a coherent, rational 
system that missionaries cannot afford to ignore or misunderstand. 
C 545 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor required. 

CD 551 La teologia latinoamericana de la liberacion 

Usando obras representativas de la teologia de la liberacion, se investigan su metodologia 
y perspectiva en comparacion con la tradicion clasica occidental. 

CD 552 Latin American Liberation Theology 

Through readings of representative Latin American liberation theologians, this course 
explores the method of liberation theology and its perspective in contrast to the North 
Atlantic theological tradition. 

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Course Offerings 



CD 553 U.S. Latino Theologies 

This seminar surveys the theologies being developed by U.S. Latino theologians and 
present in Latino fiction. Special attention is paid to theological starting points, 
methodology and pastoral implications. 

C 560 Advanced Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry 

Designed for those with extensive cross-cultural experience. Using rites of passage, 
liminality, personal and social transformation and global mission to develop theory, 
principles and process to train and become a guide for others. 

WC 565 Liturgical inculturation 

A seminar that explores the inculturation of the Church's worship from its cultural 
roots in Judaism to the period after Vatican II, with discussion of methodology and 
contemporary theology. 

EC 570 Revolution and Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

An examination of various interpretations of revolution and liberation in classical 
Western political philosophy, Third World thought and present-day theological and 
ethical literature. Special attention will be given to Latin American liberation theology. 

C 575 Mission Integration Seminar 

An integrating seminar for those returning from missionary, cross-cultural or overseas 
training (OTP) placements. 

BC 581 Forms and Meanings in Bible and Culture 

This seminar examines recurring themes in culture and the Old Testament to see what 
light each can cast on the other and on the missionary and theological enterprises. Topics 
may include kmship, power, language and ideas of God. 

EC 588 Seminar on Christ, Community and Christian Ethics 

This course is designed to study the implications of christology for the life of the 
Christian community as an ethical community in an increasingly secular, scientific, 
culturally and religiously pluralistic world. 

C 593 La kota -Christian Dialogue 

Orientation, a week-long field intensive on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in 
South Dakota, and debriefing led together with traditional and Christian Lakota (Sioux) 
and Christian missionaries. Travel costs to be arranged. 

C 594 Spirituality, Ministry and Survivors of Human Rights Abuses 

A seminar combining assigned readings and field assignments with three Chicago 
agencies working with and for survivors of torture and human rights abuses. What is our 
pastoral responsibility in accompanying survivors on their journey to healing and 
reconciliation? How does that process inform and challenge our theology, mission, 
mmistry and spirituality? 

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Course Offerings 



C 597 Independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 

C 606 Mission Trends: Hispanic Ministry 

This seminar explores the socio-political, cultural, historical, theological and religious 
factors which impact the frammg of a valid pastoral approach to U.S. Hispanics. 



Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies (HDS) 

Stephen Bevans, S.V.D., Archimedes Fornasari, M.C.C.J., Zachary Hayes, O.F.M., Kevin Madigan 
(chair), Thomas Nairn, O.F.M., John Pawlikowski, O.S.M., Jamie Phelps, O.P., Robert Schreiter, 
C.Pp.S., Paul Wadell, C.P. Adjunct: John Linnan, C.S.V., Theodore Ross, S.J. 

Historical Studies ^ 

H 300 History of Early Christianity 

The Christian movement to A.D. 600. Christian self- identification vis-a-vis the 
non-Christian world, developing institutional church structures and practice, theological 
and doctrinal developments. 

H 307 The Middle Ages and the Reformation 

Gregory the Great (600) to the Council of Trent (1545-1563), focusing on development 
of the medieval Church, relations between East and West, history of theology, 
breakdown of the medieval synthesis and the significance of the major reformers. 

H 313 From Trent to Vatican II 

Key issues in Catholicism of the last four centuries: the mentality following the 
Reformation, Jansenism, Newman and the Oxford Movement, forces influencing Vatican 
I, Modernism and its reaction, pertinent problems of the twentieth century. 

CH 325 Models of Missionary Activity 

A survey of the variety of forms of missionary activity in the Church's history from the 
Apologists in the Roman Empire to the classical image of the nineteenth century 
missionary. The relevance of these models for mission today is also considered. 

H401 Patristics 

A study of the theological perspectives of major writers of the early Church. 
Prerequisite: H 300, H 302 or CH 325. 

CH 420 Modern Mission History 

This course will study the exciting and challenging period of modem mission history in 
the Roman Catholic Church from the end of the French Revolution through the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries to the present day. 

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Course Offerings 



HB 505 Topics in the History of New Testament Exegesis 

An analysis of some of the ways in which the Gospels and the Pauline letters were 
interpreted in the ancient and medieval Church. 

DH 517 Structures of Reform: Gregory VII, Lateran, Trent and Vatican II 

This seminar will attempt to discern paradigms for ecclesial reform in sixteenth and 
seventeenth century Roman Catholic theological movements and schools of spirituality 
to show how these structures of reform illuminate contemporary issues in Roman 
Catholicism. 

CH 525 Early Christianity in Asia 

This course investigates earliest contacts of Christians with Asian traditions. 
It distinguishes facts, hypotheses and legends as a framework for assessing the 
significance of such contacts. 

H535 The Holocaust, 1933-1945 

This course will examine the history of the Holocaust, paying special attention to the 
response of the Catholic and Protestant churches from 1933 to 1945 and to modem 
theological, literary, dramatic and cinematic reflections on the Holocaust. 

H 597 Independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 

Doctrinal Studies 

D 295 Philosophical Foundations of Catholic Theology 

Surveys major streams of Western philosophy and their contribution to Catholic 
theology. (No credit will be given but the course may satisfy, in part, admission 
requirements in philosophy.) 

D 325 Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources and methods of theology worked out from a study 
of several case histories. Special emphasis on historical revelation in Christianity and the 
developing awareness of faith in relation to shifting horizons. 

D 430 The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

Analysis of why God has become problematic for contemporary society is followed by 
critical review of representative Christian attempts to respond. The course helps students 
evaluate their experience and respond intelligently to the modem problem of God. 

D 435 Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning origins, evil and finality. This course 
focuses principally on the Christian tradition with only occasional references to similar 
themes in world religions. 

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Course Offerings 



D 436 Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 

A study of the notion of myth, mythic consciousness and the way myths are used in the 
Bible and in various cultures to express the origin of the world and humankind, the origin 
of evil and the individual and collective end. 

D 440 Christology 

A study of the foundational questions of christology in the light of the critical, historical 
study of the Scripture and the theological tradition. 

DC 441 Christology and Cultures 

A study of how the confession of Jesus Christ interacts with cultural processes. Special 
attention is given to the New Testament and patristic periods and also to contemporary 
movements in the world Church today. 

DC 442 Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry 

Studies Jesus the Christ revealed through Scripture, traditions and theological 
scholarship, to help students understand the meaning of Jesus Christ for their personal 
life, contemporary society and as ground for mission or pastoral practice. 

D 444 Priesthood in the Roman Catholic Tradition 

A study of the origins of ordained ministry in the early Church, its gradual 
transformation as the Church becomes a political power, its reformation in the sixteenth 
century, its image from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries and its renewal at 
Vatican Council II. 

D 445 Theology of the Church and Its Ministry 

A theology of the Church and its ministry in light of their historical development from 
seminal beginnings in the apostolic age to various syntheses offered by post- Vatican II 
theologians. 

DC 446 Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

This course critically examines the theological and biblical foundations of the missionary 
nature of the Church and major challenges facing that issue today, e.g., inculturation, 
evangelization, social justice and prophetic witness. 

CD 454 Hacia una ecleslologia desde la perspectiva hispana 

Se busca el rol de la comunidad hispana como iglesia dentro de los EEUU por analizar su 
contexto social y su eclesiologia incipiente en dialogo con las fuentes tradicionales 
eclesiolgicas. 

CD 455 Toward an Hispanic Theology of Church 

This course will explore the particular role of the Hispanic community as Church in the 
United States by analyzing its socio-political context and incipient ecclesiology in 
dialogue with traditional ecclesiological sources. 



65 



Course Offerings 



CD 456 God Images in Hispanic Religiosity 

This course explores the meaning behind God images in Meso- American religion and 
Mexican popular religiosity in dialogue with Western classical and feminist theologies. 

D 509 The Parish and Ministry in Post-Industrial Urban Society 

This seminar will study how the possibilities and constraints of urbanization shape the 
social structure of the parish and modify traditional conceptions and practice of ministry. 

D 510 Using the Roman Catechism: Issues in Faith and Theology 

To use the new Roman Catechism effectively a clear understanding of its faith concern 
and theological framework is necessary. This seminar will explore these issues of faith 
and theology. 

DB 515 The Bible: A Problem for Christianity? 

An examination of the problems posed for Christianity, and in particular Christian 
theology, by modem historical-critical study of the Bible and modem science. 

D 516 North American Theology: A Multicultural Reading 

A seminar which investigates the multicultural roots and present shape of North 
American theology. 

DH 517 Structures of Reform: Gregory VII, Lateran, Trent and Vatican II 

This seminar will attempt to discern paradigms for ecclesial reform in sixteenth and 
seventeenth century Roman Catholic theological movements and schools of spirituality 
to show how these stmctures of reform illuminate contemporary issues in Roman 
Catholicism. 

D 521 The Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx 

A seminar on the main lines in the thought of Edward Schillebeeckx, emphasizing his 
understanding of the relation of God and the world and questions of hermeneutics. 

D 524 Roman Catholic Theology in the Age of Revolution: 1775-1918 

This seminar will study the conflicts within Roman Catholic thought in the context of the 
intellectual, cultural and political upheavals of nineteenth century Europe. 

D 545 Special Questions in Ecclesiology 

This seminar will examine pertinent contemporary issues facing the Church today. Some 
of these are inculturation, communio, the nature and mission of the Church, the role of 
women and the hierarchy. 

CD 551 La teologia latinoamericana de la liberacion 

Usando obras representativas de la teologia de la liberacion, se investigan su metodologia 
y perspectiva en comparacion con la tradicion clasica occidental. 



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Course Offerings 



CD 552 Latin American Liberation Theology 

Through readings of representative Latin American liberation theologians, this course 
explores the method of liberation theology and its perspective in contrast to the North 
Atlantic theological tradition. 

CD 553 U.S. Latino Theologies 

This seminar surveys the theologies being developed by U.S. Latino theologians and 
present in Latino fiction. Special attention is paid to theological starting points, 
methodology and pastoral implications. 

DS 554 Vatican II and a Spirituality for Family and the World of Work 

Vatican II defines the Church as the "People of God" and locates this people in the 
modem world. This seminar will explore several elements of this teaching that 
contributes to a spirituality for family and the world of work. 

D 556 Christology of St. Bonaventure 

A study of the relation between spirituality, systematic christology and cosmic 
christology in the writings of St. Bonaventure. Students will read primary sources in 
Bonaventure's writings and secondary literature about Bonaventure. Prerequisite: D 440 
or its equivalent. 

D 572 Power, Authority and Ministry 

This seminar will study the nature and exercise of power and authority as it applies to 
ministry in the Christian community. 

D 576 Black Theology in Dialogue 

This seminar will critically examine the historical roots, meaning, methods, content and 
development of Black Theology in the United States and its dialogue with African, Latin 
American and feminist liberation theologies. Implications for the Church's mission and 
ministry will be addressed. 

BD 580 Feminist Hermeneutics in Bible and Theology 

A seminar that investigates biblical texts and doctrinal themes from a feminist 
perspective. 

D 584 Readings in Asian Christian Theology 

This seminar focuses on selected topics in Christian theology of Asia. 

D 597 Independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 

D 605 Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar exploring various factors influencing the development of theology in different 
cultural contexts. 

6? 



Course Offerings 



D 610 Theological Anthropology In Cross -Cultural Perspective 

A seminar exploring the challenges raised to classical themes in theological anthropology 
by the variety of cultures in the world Church. 

Ethical Studies 

E 370 Introduction to Christian Ethics 

This course is an introductory study of the basic themes of Christian ethics. Particular 
attention will be paid to the Roman Catholic moral tradition, including such topics as the 
virtues, the natural law, moral decision-making and narrative. 

E 375 Introduction to Social Ethics 

An exploration of the basic texts that illuminate how the Christian community has 
understood and shaped its response to the social concerns of its time. Emphasis is given 
to foundational texts of the Roman Catholic tradition. 

EC 402 Natural Law and Christian Ethics 

A study of the relevance of some Western and non- Western Natural Law traditions in 
view of arriving at a vision of a universal common good that can generate a Christian 
ethical discourse capable of intercultural and interreligious communication. 

EC 406 Ethical Significance of Christian Humanism 

A critical study of the debate about the existence and nature of Christian humanism and 
its relevance for the ethos and mission of the Church. 

EC 410 Proclaiming Shalom in a Violent World 

How does the Church understand and actualize its mediatory role between God's offer of 
peace in Christ and the search for peace on the part of the human community? The 
question will be approached both historically and systemically. 

EC 422 Global Economic Justice and the Church 

We dare not provide an ethic of economic life that is not in strict relation to an ethic of 
political life and an ethic of communication. A Christian ethic must test its claims to 
normativity by the difference it makes for these interrelationships. 

EC 425 World Poverty, Development and Life's Liberation 

Investigates and assesses the world's division into rich and poor countries. Studies 
poverty, development and liberation in the light of Scripture and Catholic social teaching 
using today's kairos for Christian communities as focus. 

E 432 Ethical Implications of Holocaust/Genocide 

Examines the annihilation of the Jews as well as the slaughter of the incapacitated, the 
Gypsies, the Poles, gay persons and others during World War II and considers the 
churches' ethical responses during that period; also treats the broader issues of genocide. 

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Course Offerings 



E 450 Care for the Earth: Ethics and the Environment 

An examination of the ecological crisis' challenges to traditional approaches to Christian 
ethics and to our understanding of humanity and its place in the world. Extent of the 
crisis and possible responses will be considered. 

E 456 The Ethics of Thomas Aquinas 

This course is a study m the moral theology of Aquinas. Particular attention is given to 
his treatment of happiness, charity, the passions, the virtues and the gifts of the Spirit. 

E 460 Friendship and Fidelity 

This course will examine how friendship with God and others is integral to the Christian 
moral life. Special attention will be given to fidelity as a crucial virtue in a relational 
understanding of ethics. 

E 481 Sexual Ethics for the Christians 

A study of sexuality and sexual behavior, especially in unmarried Christians. It will 
investigate the moral tradition, the elements which form a contemporary Christian vision 
of sexuality and how these relate to sexual conduct. 

E 482 Medical Ethics 

A study of the relation of general ethical principles and methods to the concerns of the 
medical profession. Among topics treated will be experimentation with human subjects, 
organ transplantation, genetic engineering, in vitro fertilization, access to health care and 
the interrelationships between the rights of patients, doctors and society. 

E 486 Marriage as Sacramental Life 

This course will examine the development of the theology of marriage in the Roman 
Catholic tradition. Special attention will be given to the sacramental character of 
marriage, dimensions of married life and the importance of fidelity. 

E 500 The Making of Moral Theology 

This course will be an overview of the development of Catholic moral theology from the 
patristic period to the present. Special attention will be given to the directions and 
concerns of Catholic morality since the Second Vatican Council. 

E 534 Love and Justice 

Various ethical systems have developed around the central theme of love or justice or 
their interaction. Differences in the understanding of these notions constitute different 
approaches to morality. This seminar will analyze, compare and critically assess the 
ways in which these notions function in Christian ethics and theology. 

EC 545 Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience 

An exploration of the relation of Christian life to political life. The origin, place and role 
of conscience in both will be investigated. Conscience will be related to the historical 
realities of community and traditions and to the unity of theory and practice proper to 
political conscience. 

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Course Offerings 



E 546 Religion and the Shaping of Public Ethical Values 

A seminar studying the public role of religion in shaping values in a global society. 
Church-State relations and human rights will be among topics considered. 

E 551 Spirituality/Liturgy and the Quest for Justice 

An examination of various models for linking spirituality/liturgy and the Church's social 
justice mission. Included are reinterpretations of the Ignatian Exercises, Thomas Merton, 
and feminist, liberationist and ecologically-centered spiritualities. 

EC 570 Revolution and Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

An examination of various interpretations of revolution and liberation in classical 
Western political philosophy, Third World thought and present-day theological and 
ethical literature. Special attention will be given to Latin American liberation theology. 

E 574 The Moral Life in Literature 

This course will examine dimensions, themes and issues in the moral life through works 
of literature. Special attention will be given to development of character and its crucial 
virtues. 

EC 588 Seminar on Christ, Community and Christian Ethics 

This course is designed to study the implications of christology for the life of the 
Christian community as an ethical community in an increasingly secular, scientific, 
culturally and religiously pluralistic world. 

E 590 Sustaining Life: Ethical Challenges 

An examination of the major global issues of our time, including food, energy, 
environmental preservation and homelessness. Ethical frameworks for responding to 
these issues will be developed out of both ecclesiastical and secular materials. 

E 597 independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 



Department of Spirituality and Pastoral Care (SPG) 

Herbert Anderson, Mary Frohlich (chair), Bruce Lescher. Adjunct: Stephanie Paulsell 



Spirituality Studies 

S 402 Introduction to the Christian Spiritual Life 

Survey traditional and contemporary practices of prayer, community, service, 
discernment and spiritual guidance, with the aim of assisting development of an 
mtegrated vision of the Christian spiritual life. 

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Course Offerings 



S 405 The Experience of Christian Vocation 

Spiritual, psychological, biblical and theological perspectives on the Christian's 
experience of being "called." While emphasis will be on patterns common to all 
Christian vocations, the origins and value of distinctions will also be examined. 

S 410 Introduction to Spiritual Companionship 

This introduction examines the history of spiritual direction, different models of 
direction, qualities of the director and aims of the experience. There will be some role 
playing and group discussion. 

S 414 Theology and Practice of Prayer 

A survey of traditional and contemporary Christian prayer styles, the development of the 
life of prayer and the role of prayer in mdividual and ecclesial life. 

CS 418 Native American Spirituality 

Mitakuye oyas'in means "all my relatives" or "I am related to all that is." Guided by 
Lakota elders we will discover the meaning of this Lakota prayer and its relationship to 
ecology, justice, and global spirituality. A week-long field trip to the Rosebud and Pine 
Ridge Reservations in South Dakota will be offered. 

S 428 Spirituality and Social Justice 

An exploration of the implications of the sociology of religion and liberation theologies 
for the spiritual life of the minister. Students will articulate their vision of how social 
justice fits into their spirituality. 

S 430 Religious Experience and the Life Cycle 

Using Erikson's eight stages of the life cycle as a framework, explores aspects of 
psychological development undergirding the experience of religion. Aspects covered 
include faith, symbolism, ritual, conscience, commitment, humility and mysticism. 

S 450 Spiritual Classics of the Early Church 

Study of selections from the most influential spiritual writings of the second to sixth 
centuries: Ignatius of Antioch, Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Desert Fathers 
and Mothers, Benedict, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius and others. 

CS 459 Origins of Hispanic Popular Religiosity 

An examination of Hispanic popular religiosity, a frequently misunderstood 
phenomenon. The course will study its Latin American roots and other mfluences that 
have shaped Hispanic religiosity in the United States. 

S 471 Contemporary Trends in Spirituality 

An exploration of significant persons and movements influencing the discussion of 
spirituality in the contemporary Church. The course includes discussion of masculine 
and feminine spirituality, cosmology, ecology, the role of the body, New Age spirituality, 
liberation movements and the relationship between spirituality and institutional religion. 

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Course Offerings 



SB 480 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The religions of Israel and early Christianity are investigated not only in their historical 
and biblical setting but also in their impact on Christian life and ministry. (May 
substitute for B 300 for students with biblical or ministerial background.) 

S 505 Foundations for the Study of Spirituality 

This course defines spirituality as a field of study, explores the relationship between 
spiritual praxis and research in spirituality, surveys research methods; evaluates the 
notion of a "spiritual classic," and examines issues in the historical study of spirituality. 

S 506 Issues in Spiritual Formation 

An overview of models and issues involved in formation processes, whether they take 
place in the parish, in religious communities or in freestanding programs. 

CS 519 Toward a Spirituality for Missionaries 

A search for an appropriate, practicable and holistic spirituality through participants' 
reflection on mission realities such as marginalization, poverty, embodiment, violence 
and burnout. 

S 526 Roots of Medieval Mysticism (7th-12th Centuries) 

After reviewing earlier traditions, this course examines classic spiritual writings of the 
seventh to the twelfth centuries. Included are selections from Eriugena, the Cistercians, 
Victorines, Carthusians, Hildegard of Bingen and Joachim of Fiore. 

S 527 Medieval Women Mystics (12th-15th Centuries) 

This course will explore women's contributions to the history, literature and theology of 
Christian mysticism from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries. Readings will include 
works by Hildegard of Bingen, Hadewijch, Clare of Assisi, Catherine of Siena, Julian of 
Norwich and others. 

S 529 History of Spirituality: Trent to Vatican II 

An overview of significant persons and movements in the history of spirituality from the 
sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. 

S 532 Thomas Merton 

An in-depth examination of the works of Thomas Merton (1915-1968), perhaps the most 
influential modem American spiritual writer. 

S 538 Advanced Seminar in Spiritual Direction 

A seminar for those with experience doing spiritual direction. The course will involve 
reading and reflection of major theoretical perspecfives on spiritual direction in the light 
of participants' ministry experience. 

S 540 Group Spiritual Process 

Participants will practice and study a group reflective process for spiritual formafion. 
Students may subsequently form and lead a group of their own as part of their Supervised 
Leadership Training (D.Min) or another ministry practicum. 

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Course Offerings 



S 542 Spiritual Formation and the Life of Study 

A seminar investigating the relationship between spiritual and academic formation. It 
will explore the spiritual disciplines of academic work and the relationship between that 
work and the work of ministry and how the vocation to a life of study enlivens both 
contemplative and active dimensions of our Christian calling. 

DS 554 Vatican II and a Spirituality for Family and the World of Work 

Vatican II defmes the Church as the "People of God" and locates this people in the 
modem world. This semmar will explore several elements of this teaching that 
contributes to a spirituality for family and the world of work. 

S 597 Independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 

S 610 Theories of Psychospiritual Development 

From a theological basis, students engage in an examination and critique of several of the 
leading models of psycho/spiritual development (including neo-Freudian, Jungian, 
structural-developmental and transpersonal). 

S612 Spirituality: Socio-economic Dimensions 

An exploration of the contribution of the sociology of religion and liberation theologies 
to the understanding of spiritual transformation. 

S 620 Perspectives on Spiritual Transformation 

Explores critical contemporary issues in the theological understanding of spiritual 
transformation with a particular focus on the appropriate use of psychological 
interpretations. 

SB 629 Jewish Mysticism, Messianism and Spirituality 

The mystical substratum of Jewish experience examined by a study of its development 
from the third pre-Christian century to the modem era, including Qumran, messianic 
movements and Hasidism. The landmark work of Gershom Scholem is carefully 
examined. 

WS 630 Liturgical Foundations of Spirituality 

Readings and seminar presentations on the stmcture, prayer forms, rhythms and theology 
of liturgy to uncover the liturgical foundations and dimensions of Christian spirituality. 
Open to M.A. and advanced M.Div. students with instmctor's permission. 

Pastoral Care Studies 

MP 360 introduction to Pastoral Care 

Focuses on 1) the many contexts of care; 2) principles and dynamics of pastoral care; 3) 
skills in empathic listening and responding to various human situations. Time is required 
outside the class in practice sessions with peers and instructor. 

73 



Course Offerings 



MP 427 Ministry with the Dying and Grieving 

An examination of 1) finitude as a human problem, 2) attachment as a human necessity 
and 3) grief as the inevitable response to a variety of loss experiences throughout life, in 
order to enhance our ministering with the dying and the grieving. 

MP 441 Pastoral Care of Families 

This course will utilize the family life cycle as a framework for exploring the family 
systems perspective and its contribution to pastoral care in a parish. Students will 
examine their own families of origin as a resource for learning to think in terms 
of systems. 

MPC 525 Empathy in a Cross-Cultural Context 

This seminar explores theoretical and practical difficulties and possibilities of empathy as 
a way of communicating understanding across cultures. Role play and case studies will 
be used to enhance the participant's empathic capacity across cultures. 

MP 531 Modern Maladies of the Soul 

This seminar examines modem maladies of the soul and proposes alternatives from the 
Christian tradition: from anxiety to courage, from loneliness to friendship, from 
cynicism to faithfulness and from despair to hope. 

CMP 541 Marriage and Family in a Cross-Cultural Context 

Marriage and family are building blocks of the Christian community. Still, across 
cultures there are diverse forms and patterns. Pastoral care and anthropology combine, 
hoping to uncover new insights and applications for pastors and missionaries. 

M 597 Independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 

WMP 643 Worship and Pastoral Care 

A seminar on the interplay between worship and pastoral care, marking individual and 
family life cycles and other situations needmg ritualization. Open to M.A. and advanced 
M.Div. students with instructors' permission. 

Word and Worship Department (W/W) 

Edward Foley, Capuchin, Richard Fragomeni (chair), Mark Francis, C.S.V., Kathleen Hughes, 
R.S.C.J., John Huels, O.S.M., Jeanette Lucinio, S.P., Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. Adjunct: Jane 
Osterholt, Richard Walsh. 

W 350 Introduction to Liturgy 

Basic issues and elements of Christian liturgy with special attention given to the liturgical 
documents of the Roman Catholic Church. Required lab sessions on dates announced at 
the beginning of the quarter. 

74 



Course Offerings 



W 355 Sacraments: Theology and Celebration 

A basic course in sacraments to explore the human rehgious experience of the faith 
community and its expressions in sacramental celebration. The Rite of Christian 
Initiation of Adults will serve as a basis for examining new sacramental models. 

MW421 Church and Structure 

An introductory course treating the nature, role and history of canon law; Church 
structures; Eastern rites; ministries and holy orders; clerical discipline; the teaching 
office; nonsacramental acts of worship; sacred places and times; general norms. 

MW 422 Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of the canon law regulating baptism, confirmation, 
Eucharist, penance, anointing of the sick and marriage. 

W 450 Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the origms and development of eucharistic liturgy and theology, with 
particular emphasis on the Eucharistic Prayer. Theological reflection on the development 
of Eucharist will prepare for discussion of contemporary issues in eucharistic theology 
and practice. 

MW 450 Introduction to Liturgical Preaching 

This practicum examines the homily as a liturgical action within the Christian assembly. 
Participants consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural and practical dynamics of preaching and 
effective communication skills. 

CW 451 Eucharist in Cross-Cultural Context 

Anthropological-liturgical study of Eucharist to uncover possible universals for relating 
Western eucharistic tradition to symbolism and life-experience of other cultures and to 
sketch issues and principles for shaping Eucharist cross-culturally. 

MW 451 Preaching Sacraments and Funerals 

Lay and ordained ministers meet multiple occasions for homilies; e.g., celebration of 
sacraments, wakes and funerals. MW45 1 develops skills in preparing and delivering 
such homilies. Prerequisite: MW 450 or equivalent. 

MW452 Preaching Retreats and Parish Missions/Renewals 

Pastoral and theological skills for leaders of retreats and parish missions/renewals include 
designing and programming such gatherings as well as writing and preaching retreat and 
renewal conferences. Prerequisite: MW450 or equivalent. 

W455 Becoming a Catholic Christian: The RCIA 

Historical, theological and pastoral reflection on the experience and sacraments of 
Christian initiation, with particular focus on the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults as 
the norm for initiatory practice. 

75 



Course Offerings 



MW 457 Preaching in a Multicultural Context: Asian 

This advanced practicum addresses the issue of lectionary preaching in a multicultural 
setting. In a systematic and practical manner, students will prepare and deliver homilies 
for assemblies of a mixed ethnic or cultural heritage. 

MW 458 Preaching the Sunday Lectionary 

MW458 considers the homily in the Sunday assembly. Participants will study the 
lectionary cycle, preach several homilies and survey the entire cycle of readings. 
Prerequisite: MW 450 or equivalent. 

MW 463: Holistic Parish Education 

To help the minister design, plan and work with staff and volunteers in a total parish 
religious education program, this course focuses on adult catechesis, evangelization, 
sacramental preparation, cultural adaptation, education in prayer and social justice. 

MW 464: Sacramental Catechesis 

Addresses the complementarity between liturgy and catechesis in such areas as initiation, 
reconciliation and marriage preparation. Practical strategies for developing programs 
and teaching methods to serve those being catechized provide the focus. 

BW 465 Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

An overview of the worship forms in the contemporary American synagogue with special 
reference to the common thread and variations in the Jewish denominations: Orthodox, 
Conservative and Reform and to historical backgrounds. (This course is sponsored by 
the Jewish Chautauqua Society.) 

BW 466 Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

The liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Sukkot and their 
theological implications. In addition to examining the core structure, special attention 
will be given to the Piyyutim (religious poetry). 

MW 474 Lay Leadership of Prayer 

A practicum in the leadership of the community's prayer, including Hours, 
catechumenate rites, wake and grave-side services, penance services, services of Word 
and Communion and ministry to the sick. 

MW 475 Worship Practicum I 

A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in leadership of 
sacramental rites, including initiation, weddings, wakes and funerals. There is a special 
emphasis on the Eucharist. It is open to students in their final year. Prerequisites: W 

350, W 450, W 455. 

MW 476 Worship Practicum II 

A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in the pastoral 
care and anointing of the sick and in the ministry of reconciliation. Prerequisites: 
W350, W450, W455. 

76 ■ 



Course Offerings 



CW 51 1 Religious Experience of Initiation 

Through a study of Christian initiation and Melanesian traditional initiation, both as 
religious-cultural phenomena, this seminar focuses on the theological, cultural and 
pastoral issues in the holistic process of contextualizing initiation. 

W 551 Liturgical Theology 

This seminar is designed to examine the liturgical event as an expression and source of 
Christian theology. 

MW 552 Liturgical Catechesis 

Drawing on the nature of liturgical celebration and principles of adult education, this 
semmar explores the nature and role of liturgical catechesis and examines several models 
for an experientially-based catechesis oriented to aduh worshipers. 

W561 Of Magic and Miracles: Medieval Worship 

The Middle Ages helped determine the shape of Christian worship. This seminar will 
provide an historical introduction to the period and explore some of its key liturgical 
practices such as benediction, pilgrimages, profession rites and the veneration of relics. 

W 563 Shaping Places for Worship 

Using a range of media and methods, this seminar will examine liturgical, spatial, artistic, 
and human issues involved in shaping places for worship. 

W 564 Seminar in Liturgical History 

A seminar that traces the history of the liturgy through watershed events, key persons, 
and important movements. Students will participate though research and presentations. 

WC 565 Liturgical Inculturation 

A seminar that explores the inculturation of the Church's worship from its cultural roots 
in Judaism to the period after Vatican II, with discussion of methodology and 
contemporary theology. 

BW 574 Feminist Hermeneutics and Worship 

Exploration through reading, discussion and ritual of how women's changing experience 
is transforming their faith and faith expressions. 

MW579 Ritual and Music 

This seminar will first chart the role and practice of music in Christian worship from its 
origins to the present day, especially noting the shift from sacred to liturgical music in 
the twentieth century. This will prepare for a discussion of principles governing musical 
usage in contemporary worship. 

W597 independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement with individual professor. 

77 



Course Offerings 



W 615 A Theology of Word and Sacrament 

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the unity and interaction of word and sacrament 
in Hturgical celebration. It joins together historical interpretation with theological 
reflection and pastoral considerations. 

W 630 Ritual Studies Seminar 

A seminar exploring the ritual dimensions of liturgical celebration; student presentations 
based on field observation and readings in ritual theory from various social sciences. 
Open to M.A. and advanced M.Div. students with instructor's permission. 

WS 630 Liturgical Foundations of Spirituality 

Readings and seminar presentations on the structure, prayer forms, rhythms and theology 
of liturgy to uncover the liturgical foundations and dimensions of Christian spirituality. 
Open to M.A. and advanced M.Div. students with instructor's permission. 

WMP 643 Worship and Pastoral Care 

A seminar on the interplay between worship and pastoral care, marking individual and 
family life cycles and other situations needing ritualization. Open to M.A. and advanced 
M.Div. students with the instructor's permission. 

W 652 Language of Prayer 

Exploration of the structure, style and content of various genres of prayer with particular 
attention to the composition and critique of liturgical texts. Research and presentation of 
selected topics also required. 

Interdisciplinary and integrative Studies 

1515: M.A.P.S. Colloquium 

An adult learning seminar designed to facilitate the integration of ministry experience 
with the study of theology for the M.A.P.S. candidate. 

1516: M.A.P.S. Colloquium II 

Each student presents a case study and employs the group's expertise in critique, 
evaluation and planning for ministry action. The theological and pastoral disciplines are 
reviewed and applied in the colloquium. 

I 530 Theology and Ministry In a Time of AIDS 

An interdisciplinary course that will examine the issues and challenges AIDS presents to 
our understandmg of theology and ministry. Special attention will be given to the issues 
AIDS raises for ethics and worship. 

1615 D.Min. Core Colloquium III 

Building upon the work of the previous core colloquia, this seminar will continue the 
focus on methods for ministry. The goal of this seminar is a defensible thesis-project 
outline and proposal. Open to advanced M.A. students with permission. 

78 



Course Offerings 



Field Education 

M 380-385-390: Ministry Practicum I 

Year-long supervised ministry to individuals at an approved site; weekly group 
theological reflection; concomitant workshops. Core requirement for first year M.Div. 
students in Track II; may be requked for Track I students early in their program. 
Approval of M.Div. Director required. 

IVI 479: M.A.P.S. Ministry Practicum 

One quarter of supervised ministry at an approved site. Depending upon the student's 
need for acquiring new skills, ministerial focus may be with individuals or with groups. 
Students are to integrate this ministerial experience through participation in the 
theological reflection group of the M.A.P.S. Colloquium II, 1516. 

M 480 - 491: Ministry Practicum II 

Year-long supervised mmistry to groups done in an area of concentration at an approved 
site (see areas below); writing of case history under a CTU consultant; concomitant 
courses, workshops. M.Div. Track II requirement, after second year; may be required of 
Track I students in their second year. Approval of consultant and M.Div. Director 
required. 

M 480-481-482: Ministry Practicum II: Religious Education 

M 483-484-485: Ministry Practicum II: Spirituality 

M 486-487-488: Ministry Practicum II: Worship 

M 489-490-491 Ministry Practicum II: Social Justice and Community Building 

M 497 Pastoral Internship 

Full-time supervised ministry experience at an approved site for two consecutive 
quarters, to introduce students to important aspects of ftill-time ministry; normally taken 
at the end of the M.Div. program. By arrangement with the M.Div. Director. Six credits. 

M 498 Overseas Training Program 

A supervised missionary, cross-cultural ministerial experience that includes language and 
culture studies. Nine credits. See the M.Div. Director for more information. 

MW 600 D.Min. Supervised Leadership Training: Worship 

MC 600 D.Min. Supervised Leadership Training: Cross-Cultural 

MS 600 D.Min. Supervised Leadership Training: Spirituality 

This concentration-specific practicum focuses on the training of other leaders. The goal 
is the exploration, testing and integration of the pastoral theories and strategies explored 
in D.Min. Core Colloquia I and II, in the training of other ministerial leaders. 



79 



80 



Student Life 



81 



Student Life 



Catholic Theological Union's academic programs lie at the heart of its mission, yet there 
is more to the life of CTU than classes. The school provides opportunities for a variety 
of extracurricular activities that play an important role in ministerial and personal 
formation. The Dean of Students and Community Services coordinates these activities 
and oversees the Student Services Office. The Dean of Students also works with the 
Formation Council, the Director of the Emmaus Program and the Student Leadership 
Team in building the CTU community. 

Student Services Office 

Virginia Piecuch, Dean of Students and Community Services 

The clearinghouse for information regarding student life at CTU is the Student Services 
Office. This office provides information on resources for spiritual direction and 
counseling, scholarship programs and student loans, ministry placement, health 
insurance, immigration forms, medical services and recreational opportunities. It serves 
as the liaison with the University of Chicago Health Service and athletic facilities. It also 
coordinates housing for mdependent students. More information about the Student 
Services Office is available in the Catholic Theological Union Student Handbook. 
Copies are available from the Dean of Students and Community Services. 

Worship 

There is a chapel on the sixth floor of the 5401 building at CTU that is available to 
students for private and group prayer throughout the day. Students are also welcome at 
the liturgies of the participating religious communities. Catholic Theological Union 
sponsors all-school liturgies regularly throughout the year. These celebrations are 
important moments in the life of CTU as a community of faith. Groups of independent 
students also meet regularly for prayer and the Eucharist. 

Housing and Food Service 

Catholic Theological Union offers housing for independent students in buildings at 5326 
and 5420 South Cornell Avenue. Students wishing to lease either an efficiency or one- 
bedroom unit should contact the Dean of Students and Community Services no later than 
30 days prior to the beginning of the quarter. Since space is limited, students should 
request a housing allotment as soon as possible after admission. If CTU housing is 
unavailable, the Dean of Students will help students find other suitable and affordable 
housing in the area. For rental rates, availability of apartments and housing policies and 
regulations, contact the Dean of Students and Community Services. Catholic 
Theological Union has a cafeteria that offers lunch service and snacks. 



82 



Student Life 




A highlight of the year is the picnic- 
at-the-point run by the students 
twice a year. The entire CTU 
community joins in to sample the 
barbeque specialities. 



University of Chicago Services 

Students at Catholic Theological Union can take advantage of the following services 
offered by the University of Chicago: University Health Services, Student Health 
Insurance, access to the University's Regenstein Library and to its athletic facilities. 
Please consult the Office of Student Services for details. 

Recreational Facilities 

Both Hyde Park and the city as a whole offer a wide range of recreational opportunities. 
Students at CTU may use the athletic facilities of the University of Chicago on payment 
of an annual fee. Other public and private facilities in the neighborhood offer 
opportunities for walking, jogging, cycling, golf, racquetball, swimming, tennis and 
fitness exercise. A short walk from the CTU campus is the magnificent lakefront park 
that the city maintains along Lake Michigan. 

Formation Council 

The formation directors from the participating communities of CTU and the 
Dean of Students and Community Services make up the Formation Council. The council 
provides formation directors an opportunity to share experiences and insights regarding 
the spiritual dimension of priestly formation. The council may make recommendations 
to the administration regarding policies that affect the religious well-being of the student 
body in general and of the students from participating communities in particular. 
Members of the Formation Council are integrated into the academic and ministerial 
programs of CTU through their presence at the Faculty Assembly, their service on 
faculty and other committees, and in some cases, by serving on the faculty. 



83 



Student Life 




Emmaus Program 

Judy Logue, Director 

All students in the M.Div. and M.A.P.S. programs 
participate in a program of personal and spiritual 
formation for ministry. Members of participating 
communities fulfill this requirement through the 
spiritual formation programs provided by their 
communities. CTU provides spiritual formation 
for other students through the Emmaus Program. 
This program provides opportunities for spiritual 
formation in both individual and group settmgs. 
The Emmaus Program offers its services to all 
students who are concerned for their personal and 
ministerial formation. 



Student Leadership Team 

The Student Leadership Team is the vehicle for student opinion and action at CTU. 
Through its representatives on the Student Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees 
and on faculty and other committees of the school, the Student Leadership Team msures 
student input on important matters affecting CTU. It also organizes social and 
recreational activities, cultural sharing events, prayer and worship opportunities, and 
educational forums. The members of the Student Leadership Team are chosen from the 
student body through a process of discernment. 

Alumni/ae Relations 

Graduates of all degree and certificate programs of CTU are eligible for membership in 
the CTU Reunion, the association of CTU alumni/ae. Membership dues of $25 are 
payable each December 3 1 and cover the following calendar year. 
Membership benefits mclude subscriptions to New Theology Review, Logos, CTU's 
quarterly newsletter, and a 25 percent discount on tuition for the Summer Institute. For 
more information contact Cy Maus, the Director of Institutional Advancement. 



84 



Financial Information 



85 



Financial Information 



Financial Aid 

Catholic Theological Union is committed to providing need-based financial aid to make 
full-time theological and ministerial education possible. The resources for this financial 
aid come from several scholarship funds. Normally assistance is only available to full- 
time students in degree programs and takes the form of tuition remission grants. 

Financial aid is awarded in quarterly increments for a period of one year or less. Awards 
are renewable based on applications submitted by March 15. New students may make an 
application for financial aid with their application for admission. The deadline for 
students matriculating in the fall quarter is May 1 . 

While CTU seeks to help students to meet the expenses associated with full-time 
graduate ministerial studies, the ukimate responsibility for these expenses rests with the 
student. Other possible sources of support are contributions from agencies, dioceses and 
parishes, student loans and part-time employment. Students engaged in ministry who 
receive tuition grants from their agency, diocese or parish may also qualify for a CTU 
matchmg grant in the form of tuition remission. The Dean of Students and Communities 
Services has information regarding Stafford Loans. There are opportunities for student 
employment at CTU. Note: Students with existing student loans who are withdrawing 
from their academic programs are to notify the Admissions Office by letter. 

Scholarships 

There are several special scholarships for which qualified students are encouraged to 
apply: 

The International Women's Scholarship Fund offers one-year scholarships covering 
tuition, books and housing. This fund benefits women from outside the United States 
who are seeking credentials for Roman Catholic ministries in their countries. 

The Augustus Tolton Scholarship Fund supports lay African-American students 
preparing for ministry in the Archdiocese of Chicago. 

The Oscar Romero Scholarship Fund supports lay Hispanic/Latin American students 
preparing for ministry in the Archdiocese of Chicago. 

Other scholarships, administered through the general scholarship fund, include 
the Mother Mary Catherine McAuley Scholarship Fund that benefits women students for 
ministry and the Carroll Stuhhnueller Scholarship Fund that supports students in the area 
of biblical spirituality (international women students receive first consideration) and the 
Dennis Geaney Scholarship Fund for Lay Students in Ministry. 

Payment Policy 

Tuition, fees and other student expenses are subject to annual review and are subject to 
change. Current rates are found in an insert to this catalog. 

86 



Financial Information 



Payment of tuition and fees is due within the first 30 days of each quarter. 
Housing is billed monthly. Late payment is subject to a 1 percent per month penalty on 
the unpaid balance. Students may request special payment plans by contacting the 
Comptroller at the beginning of the quarter. Students with unpaid balances in one 
quarter may register for the following quarter on a conditional basis. Unpaid balances 
cannot be carried past the following quarter or into the next academic year. Catholic 
Theological Union reserves the right to withhold registration, library privileges, transfer 
of credits, diplomas and transcripts until all charges and penalties have been paid in full. 
Students who are m financial arrears may not complete registration without consulting 
with the business office. 

Refund Policy 

When withdrawing from courses, students are to follow procedures set out by the 
Registrar. Refunds are available according to the following schedule: 

Through the first week of the quarter full refund 

Through the second week of the quarter 75% refund 

Though the thu-d week of the quarter 60% refund 

Through the fourth week of the quarter 40% refund 

Through the fifth week of the quarter 15% refund 

After the fifth week of the quarter, there is no refund. 

Continuation Fee 

Students who complete all course work for their degrees must register every quarter until 
they complete all other requirements for graduation. They will pay a nominal 
continuation fee connected with this registration. The continuing students who make 
regular use of the library and faculty advisement will be charged a slightly higher fee. 




Assistant Professor of Church 
History Kevin Madigan, like other 
CTU faculty members, not only 
does research and writing in his 
field but also takes time to 
mentor students. 



87 



i 



Appendix 



t:^ I 



'm 



i* 



89 



Appendix 



THE ADMINISTRATION 



Office of the President 

Norman E. Sevan, C.S.Sp., President 

Donald Senior, C.P., Special Assistant to the President 

Shirley Brin, Executive Assistant to the President 

Office of the Vice-President and Academic Dean 

Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M., Acting Vice-President and Academic Dean 

Virginia Thuftedal, Administrative Assistant to the Dean 

JoAnn McCaffrey, Registrar 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P., Director of the Library 

Keiren O'Kelly, Director of Recruitment and Admissions 

Office of the Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Bonnie Hawkms, Financial Consultant 
Karyn Vanderwarren, Comptroller 
Dan Ryan, Director of Maintenance 

Office of Institutional Advancement 

Cyrin F. Maus, Director of Institutional Advancement 
Pattie Wigand Sporrong, Public Relations Director 
Rebecca Paredes, Development Associate 
Martha Harris, Administrative Assistant 
Veronica Diaz, Secretary 

Office of Student Services 

Virginia Piecuch, Dean of Students and Community Services 
Linda Mosley, Administrative Assistant 



90 



Appendix 



COMMUNITIES PARTICIPATING IN THE UNION 



Augustinians 

■ Province of Our Mother 
of Good Counsel 

Claretians 

■ Eastern Province 

Clerics of St. Viator 

■ Chicago Province 

Comboni Missionaries of the Heart 
of Jesus 

■ North American Province 

Congregation of the Blessed 

Sacrament 

St. Ann Province 

Congregation of the Holy Ghost 
(Spiritans) 

■ Eastern Province 
Western Province 

Congregation of the Mission 

(Vincentians) 

Midwest Province 

Congregation of the Oratory 
of St. Philip Neri 
(Oratorians) 
Rock Hill, SC 

The Crosiers 
U.S.A. Province 



Franciscans 

■ Assumption Province 

■ Sacred Heart Province 

■ St. John the Baptist Province 
Holy Family Custody 

Franciscan Capuchins 

■ St. Joseph Province 

Franciscan Conventuals 
St. Bonaventure Province 

■ Catholic Foreign Mission 
Society of America (Maryknoll) 

Missionary Oblates of Mary 
Immaculate 

■ Central U.S.A. Province 
Northern U.S.A. Province 

Missionaries of St. Charles 

(Scalabrinians) 

Province of St. John the Baptist 

Missionaries of the Precious Blood 
Cincinnati Province 
Kansas City Province 

Missionaries of the Sacred Heart 

■ U.S.A. Province 

Norbertines 

St. Norbert Abbey 



Discalced Carmelite Friars 
Province of the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary 



91 



Appendix 



Passionists 

■ Holy Cross Province 

St. Paul of the Cross Province 

Priests of the Sacred Heart 
North American Province 

Redemptorist Fathers and Brothers 

■ Denver Province/New Orleans 
Vice-Province 

St. Nicholas Diocese of the 
Ukrainian Catholic Church 
(Chicago) 



Servites 

■ Eastern Province 

Society of the Divine Word 

■ Chicago Province 

Society of St. Columban 

■ American Region 

The Xaverian Missionaries 

■ U.S.A. Province 



■ Corporate Member of Catholic 
Theological Union 



<^0^§^m^^^m< 



WWM 




Barbara E. Bowe, R.S.C.J., associate professor of Biblical Studies, directs the Biblical Spirituality 
Program. She is one of the many distinguished scholars who teach at CTU. 



92 



Appendix 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Rev. Martin Kirk, C.M.F., Chair 
Provincial Treasurer 
The Claretians 
Chicago, IlUnois 

Rev. Raymond Diesbourg, M.S.C., 

Vice-Chair 

Director of Development and 

Communication 

Missionaries of the Sacred Heart 

Aurora, Illinois 

Mr. Edmund A. Stephan, Jr., 

Secretary 

Dean Witter Reynolds, Inc. 

Riverwoods, Illinois 

Mr. W. James Armstrong 

Retired 

Wihnette, Illmois 

Mr. Thomas J. Boodell, Jr. 

Attorney 

Rudnick and Wolfe 

Chicago, Illmois 

Rev. James Braband, S.V.D. 
Secretary of Education, Formation, 
and Recruitment 
Society of the Divine Word 
Techny, Illinois 

Rev. Sergio Contran, M.C.C.J. 
Provincial Treasurer 
Comboni Missionaries 
Cincimiati, Ohio 



Rev. Michael Doyle, O.S.M. 
The Servites 
Denver, Colorado 

Rev. Mario DiCicco, O.F.M. 
Franciscans, Sacred Heart Province 
Chicago, Illmois 

Mr. John Fontana, III 
Management Consultant 
Morrison Associates, Ltd. 
Palatine, Illinois 

Rev. Randolph Graczyk, Capuchin 
Provincial Consultor 
Capuchins, Province of St. Joseph 
Pryor, Montana 

Rev. Harry Grile, C.Ss.R. 
Director of Formation 
The Redemptorists 
Chicago, Illinois 

Rev. Lawrence Lewis, M.M. 

Director of Formation and 

Education 

MaryknoU Missionaries 

Maryknoll, New York 

Rev. Thomas Luczak, O.F.M. 
Provincial Councilor 
Franciscans, Assumption Province 
Cedar Lake, Indiana 

Mr. Anthony Mandolini 
National Public Funds Advisor 
SEI Capital Resources 
Glenview, Illinois 



93 



Appendix 



Rev. Ivan Marchesin, S.X. 
Formation Director 
The Xaverians 
Chicago, IlHnois 

Rev. Donald McEachin, C.S.Sp. 
Duquesne University 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mr. John McHugh 

Attorney 

Michael Best and Friedrich 

Chicago, Illinois 

Rev. Robert Moosbrugger, O.M.I. 
Provincial Treasurer 
Oblates, Central U.S. Province 
St. Paul, Minnesota 

Ms. Joan F. Neal 
Vice-President and 
Director of Public Relations 
Harris Trust and Savmgs Bank 
Chicago, Illinois 

Mr. William E. Reidy 
Senior Consultant 
Burson-Marsteller 
Chicago, Illinois 

Rev. Thomas Reynolds, S.S.C. 

Director of the Mission Education 

Center 

The Columbans 

Chicago, Illinois 



Rev. Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M. 

Franciscans, St. John the Baptist 

Province 

Professor of Liturgy 

St. Meinrad School of Theology 

St. Meinrad, Indiana 

Rev. Richard Rinn, C.S.V. 
Assistant Provincial 
The Viatorians 
Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Rev. Robin Ryan, C.P. 
Professor of Theology 
St. John's Seminary 
Brighton, Massachusetts 

Mr. John Schomack 
Chairman 

KraftSeals Corporation 
Lake Forest, Illinois 

Rev. Michael Slattery, O.S.A. 
Provincial Consultor 
The Augustinians 
Chicago, Illinois 

Dr. Barry Sullivan 
Dean, School of Law 
Washington and Lee University 
Lexington, Virginia 



94 



Appendix 



ACCREDITATION 

• Incorporated in the State of Illinois as an Institution of Higher Education, 
November 27, 1967. 

• Approved as a degree-granting institution by the Department of Higher Education, 
State of Illmois, September 1969. 

• Accredited by the Association of Theological School in the United States and 
Canada [ATS], January 1972. ATS; 10 Summit Park Drive; Pittsburgh, PA 16275- 
1103; (412) 788-6505. 

• Accredited by the North Central Association of College and Secondary Schools 
[NCA], March 1972. NCA; 30 N. LaSalle St., Suite 2400; Chicago, IL 60602-2504. 
(312)263-0456. 

• Approved for Veterans' Benefits, Title 38, U.S. Code, Chapter 36, September 23, 

1970. 

• Authorized under Federal Law to enroll non-immigrant alien students, October 28, 

1971. 

• Qualified as a non-profit, tax exempt institution pursuant to the Internal Revenue 
Code, section 501 (c)(3). 

• Member of the National Catholic Educational Association, the Association of 
Clinical Pastoral Education, the Midwest Association of Theological Schools, and 
the Association of Chicago Theological Schools. 



95 



Appendix 



THE ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



Catholic Theological Union 
(Roman Catholic) 
5410 S. Cornell Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 60615-5698 



Mundelein Seminary 
(Roman Catholic) 
1000 E. Maple 
Mundelein, IL 60060-1174 



Chicago Theological Seminary 
(United Church of Christ) 
5757 S. University Ave. 
Chicago, IL 60637-9990 

Garrett-EvangelicalTheological 
Seminary 

(United Methodist) 
2121 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, IL 60201-3298 



North Park Theological Seminary 
(Evangelical Covenant Church) 
3225 W. Foster Ave. 
Chicago, IL 60615-4895 

Northern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

(American Baptist Churches) 

660 Butterfield Road 

Lombard, IL 60148-5698 



Lutheran School of Theology 
(Evangelical Lutheran Church 
in America) 
1 100 E. 55th Street 
Chicago, IL 60615-5199 



Seabury- Western Theological 
Seminary 

(Episcopal Church) 
2122 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, IL 60201-2938 



McCormick Theological Seminary 
(Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.) 
5555 S. Woodlawn Ave. 
Chicago, IL 60637-1692 



Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
(Evangelical Free Church) 
2065 Half Day Road 
Deerfield, IL 60015-1283 



Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School 
(Unitarian Universalist Association) 
5701 S. Woodlawn Ave. 
Chicago, IL 60637-1602 



96 



Appendix 



MAILING ADDRESS 

Catholic Theological Union at Chicago 
5410 South Cornell Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60615-5698 

We can respond quickly if correspondence is sent to one of the 
following offices: 

Academic Programs 

M.Div. Director 
M.A. Director 
M.A.P.S. Director 
D.Min. Director 

Admissions 

Director of Recruitment and Admissions 

Alumni/ae 

Director of Institutional Advancement 

Augustus Tolton Schoiarstiip Program 

Director of the Tolton Program 

Business Affairs 

Vice-President for Administration and Finance 

Certificate Programs 

Biblical Spirituality: Director of the Israel Study Programs 
Liturgical Studies: Chair of the W/W Department 
Pastoral Studies: Du-ector of Continuing Education 
Spiritual Formation: Chair of the SPC Department 
Cross-Cultural Mission: Chair of the CCM Department 

Continuing Education 

Director of Continumg Education 

Facuity Personnel 

Academic Dean 

Financial Aid 

Dean of Students and Community Services 

Gifts and Bequests 

Director of Institutional Advancement 



97 



Appendix 



Housing 

Dean of Students and Community Services 

Israel Study Programs 

Director of Israel Study Programs 

Oscar Romero Scholars Program 

Director of the Oscar Romero Scholars Program / >, 

Public Relations 

Director of Public Relations 

Summer Institute 

Director of Continuing Education 

Transcripts 

Registrar 

TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

The telephone number for Catholic Theological Union is 324-8000. 

The area code for CTU numbers is 3 12 until October 1996 when it will change to 773. 

We will be able to serve you better if you call directly to the following numbers: 

Admissions 324-8000 

Augustus Tolton Program 753-5336 

Continuing Education 753-5316 

Dean's Office 753-5306 

D.Min. Du-ector 753-5325 

Financial Aid 753-5310 

Housing 753-5310 

Institutional Advancement Office 753-5318 

Israel Study Programs 753-5355 

Library 753-5321 ^ ■ 

M.A. Du-ector 753-5344 

M.A.P.S. Director 753-5317 

M.Div. Director 753-5314 

Oscar Romero Program 753-5337 

President's Office 753-5308 

Registrar 753-5320 

Public Relations 753-5319 

You may also FAX inquiries to (3 1 2) 324-8490. 
The faculty FAX number is (3 1 2) 324-4360. 



98 



Appendix 



DIRECTIONS 

Catholic Theological Union is located on the southeast comer of 54th Street and Cornell 
Avenue in Chicago. One can reach CTU easily from Lake Shore Drive, the Dan Ryan 
Expressway (190-94) and the Chicago Skyway (190). 

Lake Shore Drive (from the south) 

Exit at 57th Street. Go west to Hyde Park Boulevard. Turn north (right) on Hyde Park 

Boulevard to 54th Street. Turn west (left) on 54th Street to Cornell Avenue. 

Lake Shore Drive (from the north) 

Exit at 53rd Street. Go west to Cornell Avenue. Turn south (left) on Cornell Avenue to 

54th Street. 

Dan Ryan Expressway (190-94) 

Exit at Garfield Boulevard. Turn east on Garfield Boulevard. In Washington Park, 
watch for the sign for 55th Street. Turn east (right) on 55th and continue to Cornell 
Avenue. Turn north (left) on Cornell Avenue to 54th Street. 



Chicago Skyway (190) 

Exit at Stony Island. Continue north on Stony Island to 56th Street. Turn east (right) on 
56th to Cornell Ave. Turn north (left) on Cornell Avenue to 54th Street. 



99 



Appendix 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1996-1997 



September 4 
September 26-27 
September 30 
October 4 
November 18-20 
November 28-30 
December 13 



Fall 

D.Min. Core Colloquium I Begins 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Last Day to Add Courses 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 



1997-1998 



September 3 
September 25-26 
September 29 
October 4 
November 17-19 
November 27-29 
December 12 



January 6 
January 10 
February 24-26 
March 2 1 



Winter 

Classes Begin 
Last Day to Add Courses 
Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 



January 5 
January 9 
February 23-25 
March 20 



Spring 



April 1 


Classes Begin 


March 30 


April 5 


Last Day to Add Courses 


April 3 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


Easter Recess 


April 10-13 


May 19-21 


Pre-registration for Fall Quarter 


May 18-20 ; 


June 5 


Graduation 


June 4 


June 6 


Spring Quarter Ends 
Summer 


June 5 


June 9-13 


Session I 


June 8-12 


June 16-20 


Session II 


June 15-19 


June 23-27 


Session III 


June 22-26 



00 



Yes. lam interested in learning more about Catholic Theological Union. 
D Contact Me. LJ Send application materials. U Arrange a campus visit. 

I am interested in the following program(s): 

r~1 Doctor of Ministry EH M.A. Theology E] Master of Divinity [H M.A. Pastoral Studies 
I I Sabbatical O Continuing Education 

Certificate: 
I— 1 Biblical Spirituality LJ Cross-Cultural Ministry I— ' Liturgical Studies LJ Spiritual Formation 

Name 



Address 


Citv State 


County 


Zip 


Phone Cdav) (evening) 




(FAX) 


I plan to begin graduate studies: 


month 


year 



\^S. I am interested in learning more about Catholic Theological Union. 
U Contact Me. LJ Send application materials. I— I Arrange a campus visit. 

I am interested in the following program(s): 

EH Doctor of Ministry EH M.A. Theology EH Master of Divinity EH M.A. Pastoral Studies 
EH Sabbatical EH Continuing Education 

Certificate: 
EH Biblical Spirituality LJ Cross-Cultural Ministry LJ Liturgical Studies LJ Spiritual Formation 

Name 



Address 


Citv State 


_ County 


ZiD 


Phone (dav) (evening) 




(FAX) 


I plan to begin graduate studies: 


month 


year 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 94949 CHICAGO, IL 

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 

CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
5401 S CORNELL AVE 
CHICAGO IL 60615-9905 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



l.llnil,M.ii.....li.l.l.l.l..l.l..llMMl.l.l.l..l 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 94949 CHICAGO, IL 

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
5401 S CORNELL AVE 
CHICAGO IL 60615-9905 



I.II..II....II..M.II.I.I.I.I..I.I..II....I.I.I.I..I 



Photography Credits 

Steven D. Arazmus, Photo Chicago 

Pgs. 6, 8. 10, 24. 43, 50, 51, 81, 84, 87, 92 

Rita Callman 

Pg.2 

Chicago Convention and Tourism Bureau 

Pg.7 

Brian Peterson 

Pg.89 

Peter J. Schultz/City of Chicago 

Cover title page, pg. 5 

P.W. Sporrong 

Pgs. 6, 12, 20, 25. 26. 52 

John l-lue-Tran. SVD 

Pgs. 12, 13. 15. 17. 18. 19. 22. 83 



Printed at: 
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